Lichtenstein Tops Warhol in Auction

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<> on October 11, 2010 in London, England.

The contemporary art world was taken by storm this week after paintings by pop artists Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein battled it out at Christie’s and Sotheby’s in New York City.

Not only did Lichtenstein’s “Ohhh…Alright…” comic strip painting of a redhead woman clutching a phone sell at $42.6 million, but it also trumped Warhol’s $35.36 million sale of a black and white coke bottle painting earlier in the week.  Once owned by actor Steve Martin, the 1964 painting was sold on Wednesday night by Las Vegas Casino resort developer Steve Wynn to an anonymous woman on the telephone. The Lichtenstein sale also smashed a previous record for Lichtenstein set in 2005, when his work In the Car fetched $16.2m. Other highlights from the week include the sale of Lichtenstein’s 1972 “Still Life with Palette” and “Girl in Mirror” paintings where telephone bidders paid $6.8 million and $4.8 million, respectively. (Read the Top 10 Most Expensive Auction Items)

Though $42.6 million isn’t cheap for a piece of art, it is still far off from the world’s most expensive painting–Pablo Picasso’s “Nude, Green Leaves and Bust” bought for $106.5 million in September 2010. (See photos of Picasso’s work in the Metropolitan Museum of Art)

5 comments
Whatanotion
Whatanotion

Way to go Cassidy; never let it be said that you took "in loco parentis" as an obligation to do what is best for the children/students.  Better to herd them like cattle and then shear them like sheep.  Make them say the pledge of allegiance and then send them off to kill and die for oil.  No skin off your child's nose.

QED
QED

Unfortunately this type of education does not work. A meta-study of 188 financial literacy programs found they did not increase overall financial literacy. The study is: M. Miller et al. January 2014. Can You Help Someone Become Financially Capable? A Meta-Analysis of the Literature. The World Bank. Policy Research Working Paper 6745.

matt28
matt28

I would say religion is not as practical as finance.  I'm sorry, schools can teach simple things like compound interest and the like in algebra courses.  The fact that they don't allows the banks and payday loan places the opportunity to take advantage of people.  I had to take a worthless government course in high school.  However, that teacher talked about finance because we had to fill time.  Politicians are against this because it would be bad if the general population actually understood how the world works.  Could you imagine if people were taught that our debt is really high and that the only reason we are okay is because we have artificially suppressed interest rates?  Or that inflation is both good and bad?  Oh dear.  No, we should teach people that women got the right to vote in the 70s as Sandra Fluke intimated.  Finance is just as much a language as Spanish.  I think the biggest issue is that public school teachers know nothing about finance.  Who would teach it?  That is the only problem here.

tkulaga
tkulaga

Using similar logic, what about the millions of adults that have no clue as to what religion is and what it is not? I propose all schools teach a comparative religion class/classes.

packardday
packardday

Please count me as being grateful for whenever I encounter a HS biology teacher who actually knows the difference between a scientific law and a scientific theory.