He’ll Be Back: Arnold Schwarznegger to Return to Silver Screen

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Former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger

Mario Anzuoni / Reuters

Now that his term’s over, the Governator may be the Terminator once more.

After seven years of public service, the former Republican governor of California announced on Twitter Friday that he’s returning to the big screen–and he’s looking for offers.  His personal aide, Daniel Ketchell, confirmed the tweet Friday morning.

Before his days as a politician, Schwarznegger starred in blockbuster hits like Terminator, True Lies, Kindergarten Cop and Twins. How Hollywood might welcome the 63-year-old’s comeback is as predictable as any election. But perhaps a role in a comedy might be a better bet than another Terminator sequel. Or, at the very least, a role in The Expendables 2.

(More on TIME.com: See A Brief History of Mr. Universe.)

8 comments
GabrielSmith
GabrielSmith

I enjoyed this story.  Your daughter reminded me very much of my 8-year old daughter.  We are a white family as well.  We attend a largely Hispanic school, with a small percentage of blacks and and whites.  My daughter is totally oblivious to race.  Most of her friends are either Hispanic or black.  It is a beautiful thing when I look out my window and see my kids running around with a rainbow of different children.  


There is no telling what my kids will learn about other races as they grow up (good or bad), but I do value these times that they are exposed to other cultures and races at such a pure and innocent level.  When they do grow up, these experiences may help them to learn to think twice about stereotypical rhetoric and to empathize with different types of people.  People who are racist, whether they be black or white are often people who grow up playing with people who are just like themselves.

EdSmith
EdSmith

Nice story. Maybe there's hope for us yet.

michael.f.passe
michael.f.passe

Racial and ethnic biases are of course learned behaviors, we all know this. NO ONE is born racist or intolerant. Those lovely attitudes are products of cultural socialization, the intolerance endemic to religion, and in the U.S. particularly on the vicious, petty politics that preoccupy and divide so many of us. My kids (who used to accurately call African Americans "brown people") went through periods where they treated all kids the same. Then in grade school they used to come home and say things like, "all black people are special" and they learned the white-guilt thing. No idea how they feel now, because now I never talk about race at all - as a white male in the U.S. you just learn to keep your mouth shut about a lot of things because you are already guilty just by your very existence. But like "MichaelBaeza" says below, if you can set your per-conceptions aside with an individual person of any race or creed, you probably grew up as good as can be expected in a divided society like ours.

MichaelBaeza
MichaelBaeza

All people, no matter how enlightened we might think we are, are affected by preconceptions upon first meeting people.  The difference between intelligent people and unintelligent ones is that the former are quick to discard these preconceptions when we realize they don't apply to the individuals we meet.  That said, I wouldn't worry that your daughter's racial awareness will rise in years to come.  Race awareness does not cause intolerance any more so than banks cause robbery.

mercurialrust
mercurialrust

Very nice story. The main point should be that a child's world view is shaped by a large part by the attitudes of their parents. 

failureofreality
failureofreality

Lesser is wrong.  Penny will care.  She will find out that she is a racist because she is white.  She will find out that she is the beneficiary of white supremacy.  She will find out that she knows nothing about her friends but that they know all about her racist nature.

michael.f.passe
michael.f.passe

@MichaelBaeza Point well taken. Perhaps it's a bit naive to say "race awareness does not cause intolerance," as "race awareness"  is a very broad term and comes about through contact with others, many of whom may or may not be bigots. But you're absolutely right about the importance of discarding preconceptions when you meet an individual.