U.S. Government Could Store European Air Passenger Info for 15 Years

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Barbara Bellingham / Getty

A draft agreement between the U.S. and the E.U. about sharing air passenger information was leaked to the Guardian, prompting outrage over what civil liberties groups say is an invasion of privacy and what creates greater potential for data mining of sensitive information.

The personal information of millions of European travelers could be stored by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security for 15 years if an agreement being worked out between the U.S. and E.U. is approved. Under the proposal, credit card info, phone numbers and home addresses of those flying from anywhere in Europe to the U.S. would be monitored and checked against watch lists and no-fly lists to combat terrorism, crime and illegal immigration. Currently, that information is stored for five years under the E.U.’s Passenger Name Record system (PNR) and is handed over to U.S. customs by airlines 72 hours before departure. The new rules would require that information to be dispatched 96 hours ahead of departure and would triple the length of time that the sensitive passenger data would be stored.

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The leak of the document comes just a week after the U.S. Senate passed a resolution saying it “simply could not accept” any lesser methods of data-sharing because the process is “an important part of our layered defenses against terrorism.” But European civil liberties groups are crying foul not only because of privacy concerns but also for concerns over profiling. The agreement notes that in exceptional circumstances, ethnic origin, political opinions, and details of health or sex life can be used if necessary to an investigation. In attempts to allay some of these fears, the document includes provisions that would mask individuals’ identities after six months. Then after five years, the data would be transferred to a dormant database with the possibility of restoring said information while it is stored for the remaining 10 years.

Jan Philip Albrecht, a German green party member of the European parliament’s civil liberties committee called the agreement “a huge infringement of data protection principles.”

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7 comments
Skreenrider
Skreenrider

This is obviously not an unbiased review of the latest Dragon Age trailer. By itself, the trailer looks to involve an engaging story, plenty of beasties to best in combat and of course the next gen graphics we have come to expect.

With positive reviews across the board (from IGN to PCGAMER) both Origins and DA2 have received stellar reviews and are important landmarks in the rpg, soloplay genre. To base DA: Inquisition on these previous games and yet with such negativity is ludicrous.

I understand the gameplay and plot devices may not be for everyone. Granted, the mechanics changed drastically from Origins to DA2, but not necessarily for the worst. The story is engaging enough, but it's really the beautiful subplots ingrained within these titles which provided the real lifeblood and replayability to this epic saga (unless you agree with the Right Wing extremists who have hated on these titles for their feminist and lbgt support).

I have deeply enjoyed the Dragon Age games, books, comics and even the table top rpg. Obviously, I am also not unbiased on the subject. However, to use this trailer in order bash Dragon Age: Inquisition based on the previous games, even though those exact same games have been VERY well recieved, is just preposterous and in bad taste.

There is a fine line between being a critic and being a hater, sir. And I suppose that's really all that needs to be said.

Ennien
Ennien

Complains that Dragon Age: Origins wasn't written well enough to be enjoyable. 


Claims to spend hours re-playing Diablo 3 because it's just so good, and compares it to FFVII as a game with amazing gameplay but a poor story. 


I'm very, very confused right now. 

johnfaucher
johnfaucher

I personally love everything about the dragon age universe. There's a ton of conflicts and clashing between factions just like in Game of Thrones. It's probably not even close to being written as well but it's not like the Game of Thrones games are any good. For a video game with civil war, racism between humans, elves and qunari, villains that do things for what they think is the greater good, decisions that everyone sees differently, politics and religion clashing with magic, dragons and demons, I have nothing to complain about. Specially when you add the fact that the games are actually fun to play.

TimNelson
TimNelson

Sir, please apologize to all the trees you've been stealing oxygen from.

CDR_60191
CDR_60191

I honestly don't see how Davids team can pull off this ''HBO of RPG's'' thing. The woman in charge of the romances is a god awful writer (the embarrassing short story that somehow earned her her creative writing degree should be burned), and David himself isn't exactly a George RR martin, even though he worked on Baldurs Gate II (if i'm wrong about that, please slap me).


After releasing three terrible games in a row (Dragon ass 2, No Effect 3, and the Trolled Republic MMO), i can't help but think that Biowares glory days are over.

naomicp1991
naomicp1991

I am beyond excited for Inquisition. I was once also a huge literary snob (I have since matured a bit), and I have to completely disagree with what you've said. It might well be down to personal taste because I find the Fallout games incredibly dull. I tried playing them several times and gave up. I find Dragon Age's stories so engaging and emotional. I just want to explore every little detail, talk to every character, know everyone's thoughts and motivations. It's kept me pondering moral questions endlessly since I first played Origins earlier this year and even had me examining my own attitude towards religion. So I would say that one person's Twilight is another's person's Ulysses.

ChuckWells
ChuckWells

Saying  "by the time I was ticking off the game’s last few achievements and rolling through its embarrassingly recycled cityscapes for the UMPTEENTH time" hardly screams I DIDN'T LIKE THIS GAME; at least to most people. I do understand that the term "umpteenth" is somewhat vague in and of itself, but it certainly suggests that you labored through a game not to your preference several times. That's a great way to preface today's comment, particularly in the wake of the release of an awesome new Dragon Age Inquisition trailer.