Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Childhood Home Becomes a Museum

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Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images

The world's first museum dedicated to Arnold Schwarzenegger opened on July 30, 2011 in his birthplace of Thal in southern Austria.

Whether or not you’re a fan of his movies or his political career (it’s probably best to leave the personal life alone), it can’t have been a shock to learn that Arnold Schwarzenegger’s childhood home has just opened as a museum in Austria.

The grand unveiling came as the Terminator/Governator/Insert term here that ends with “nator” turned 64. The home is in the village of Thal, near the city of Graz and contains his childhood bed, a motorcycle from one of the Terminator movies, and a copy of the desk he used as governor of California. “He was especially proud of his old bed made of steel tubes where he used to lay and dream his dreams,” said the director of the Museum, Peter Urdl. We’re not sure about you, but that sounds a touch unpleasant to us.

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Schwarzenegger lived in this first-floor flat from his birth in 1947 (a sign reads “Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Birth House Museum,”) until 1966 when he left to embark upon that dream of winning Mr. Universe.

Unsurprisingly, bodybuilding is a key component of the museum: visitors are treated to trophies and photographs from those early days, some of his first dumb-bells, and an original work-out machine, a pulley with weights attached that resided in a door frame inside the flat. What’s more, we’re privy to his obsessive training routine, with the takeaway that his success in bodybuilding resulted in his stellar success in Hollywood.

And that movie career isn’t neglected either: in addition to the Terminator motorcycle is a life-size model of the iconic character, plus a sword from Conan the Barbarian. But if you’re wondering, there isn’t exactly much in the way of memorabilia relating to his personal life. There is a photo showing the rowing boat in which he proposed to his now-estranged wife, Maria Shriver, on a nearby lake, but that’s about it.

Sadly, upon exiting the museum, there doesn’t seem to be any sort of sign indicating “I’ll be back,” which is a missed pun opportunity that the museum may live to regret. Then again, that’s probably why NewsFeed isn’t in the museum game. (via BBC)

Glen Levy is an Executive Producer at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @glenjl. You can also continue the discussion on TIME’s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.

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13 comments
BorisIII
BorisIII

I see people as endless combinations of DNA programs.That are being re-programed constantly by every time something effects are thinking throughout our lives.Our DNA and past events create who we are.So a CEO of a huge corporation or homeless meth addict, I respect the same.So I can’t be for capitol punishment.  We are just the result of our DNA and past events.  Like constantly re-programed robots and the reason everyone is so different from each other.


mrbomb13
mrbomb13

I'm willing to bet $10,000 in serious cash that David Westin would not have written this article if the botched execution had not occurred. 


Yet, naturally, Mr. Westin (like many opponents of capital punishment) paint with a broad brush by first seizing on the tragedy, and then propagating that the whole practice is flawed/immoral/etc..  In other words, if one execution goes wrong, than surely the whole process should be banned.


For the next week or so, readers can expect all kinds of writers to pen various articles on how the death penalty should be banned (etc.).  Then, naturally, people will forget, and life can go on as usual - until the next unfortunate accident.  Then, readers can expect guys like Mr. Westin to write such articles again, and then forget those articles....


...the cycle never ends.

Kalyan
Kalyan

As the most profound freedom fighter has once said - an eye for an eye will only make the world blind, I am against death sentence. Because it doesn't do anything to improve our future and also because you can not take something which you can not give.

DanBruce
DanBruce

The problem is not with the justice of capital punishment (assuming fair trials), it is in the methodology of the executions. As it is now, everyone suffers, especially those who have to administer the execution for the state. We need to change to hypoxia as the method of execution. All that is needed is an air-tight room and a way to gradually reduce the air pressure to that equivalent to being on the summit of Mt. Everest. By breathing thin air, the condemned essentially executes himself or herself, lapsing into unconsciousness before death occurs. Hypoxia is clean, inexpensive, and humane. We need to adopt that method of execution nationwide. Some crimes are so heinous that they demand execution as the penalty.

formerlyjames
formerlyjames

Nobody either in favor of or opposed to capital punishment can honestly deny that the practice is random, arbitrary, capricious.  That's enough to ban it.

rightist
rightist

I am not against death penalty for very henious crimes and the guy deserves death for his crime. But death is final and unless the system can guarantee an innocent will not be executed, then the death penalty should be put on hold.

INTP
INTP

A life for a life seems very fair to me. Disregarding the time spent deliberating, I am an advocate of the death penalty. No victims life should be cheapened, much less on my dime.


ReneDemonteverde
ReneDemonteverde

@DanBruce  Method of execution was changed from time to time because libturds want the most humane killing for these wastrels. There is no perfect way the most painless and pleasant way to kill these scums. There is always a possibility that the method could go wrong. But what should concern these liberals are the grief and stress the bereaved families are undergoing. 

MartinHarvey
MartinHarvey

@formerlyjames  I think you need to look up the definitions of the words random, arbitrary and capricious. Capital punishment is none of those things.

Hollywooddeed
Hollywooddeed

@INTP  

You must be one of those Christians I've heard so much about.  The death penalty is not the mark of a civilized society.

And before you start bleating about my not knowing what I'm talking about because a family member has not been a victim of violent crime, you're quite wrong about that.

MartinHarvey
MartinHarvey

@Hollywooddeed @INTP  Thanks for preaching how I should feel, based on what you feel. Before you start bleating about the mark of a civilized society, you should first explain how robbing, shot gunning and burying alive a nineteen year old girl should allow one to live in any way in a civilized society.

DanBruce
DanBruce

@Hollywooddeed @INTP  The Bible in no instance prohibits the state from exercising a death penalty. Individuals on their own authority are prohibited from killing, but the state has that authority.