Late-Night Laughs: The 5 Best Comedy Clips of the Week

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NBC

This week in late-night comedy, Stephen Colbert talked Cinnabon while Roseanne Barr announced her presidential run.

Best Political Point: On The Daily Show, Jon Stewart introduced the “super committee,” a group of legislators charged with finding actual ways to cut debt. Needless to say, he turns them into superheroes.

(LIST: Top 10 Jon Stewart Moments)

Best Knockoff: This week, photos surfaced of a fake Apple store and a knockoff Ikea in China. Conan O’Brien even found a knockoff Conan in China.

Best Birthday Celebration: As President Obama turned 50 this week, David Letterman used his Late Show Top 10 List to discuss how he should celebrate.

Best Announcement: On The Tonight Show, Roseanne Barr told Jay Leno she’s running for president. Her platform is, well, as eccentric as she is.

Best Interview: Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain, host of the Travel Channel’s No Reservations, stopped by The Colbert Report. You’ll be surprised by the most grotesque thing he’s ever eaten.

(LIST: Top 10 Stephen Colbert Moments)

21 comments
RichardBarnes
RichardBarnes

We've been dealing with this for decades.  I left the service in 1985.  I had about 60 credit hours of schooling and 5 years of on the job use/training, but it was all classified.. Thus no credit in the University system.  It's tough but how do we correct this?

Channah
Channah

Not just the military--but those in the work place need to be able to apply experience toward credit.  35 years ago, a dear friend wanted his college degree and he was in his early 40s.  This was in Texas.  He was able to transfer alot of experience into credit toward that degree.  I don't know if they will still do that, or not.

Tommy34684
Tommy34684

My question is how well can these individuals perform in a regular (non-VA)  hospital setting?  The veteran needs to look beyond USF and other universities because that is not where the money is made.

13Stoploss
13Stoploss

Errors:


-It's Veterans Affairs, not administration. Been that way since the Dodgers last won the World Series.

-The GI Bill isn't exhausted after 4 years. However, 36 months of benefits equals 4 school years. Some vets are eligible for up to 48 months of benefits, which is 5+ school years of benefits. 

schommerp
schommerp

Back in the late 70s, as a vet attending St. Louis University, I had my Military Occupational Specialty evaluated by a collegiate institution offered through SLU that derived an amount of credit hours based on my coursework at Ft. Sam Houston and also credit for practicum experience on the job. 


 There was a nominal fee for this service and a registration fee with the university to add the 26 credit hours to my transcript.  This service offered a terrific advantage and I felt very good about getting some credit for my military experience.  Why is this service not offered now?  Somehow back then they got it right.  Why not now for vets who are even more highly trained than I was?

jmcelroy888
jmcelroy888

The Military somehow has put a Credit towards education for tasks learned in the Military. Its just a morale booster for the short timers and those who wish to move on or those working on their education.  The degree I got from ITT would be considered Top Secret information in the Military. And they would not tell you how things work because its classified or need to know basis. Its a cruel game some play when competing for rank. The people I've seen benefit from experience is XRay, Construction and Commercial large Aircraft.

mccoyflowersjm
mccoyflowersjm

It really boils down to two factors:  lack of understanding and the misguided thought that academic knowledge trumps military experience; the former is partially understandable given that the majority of the population does not truly know the myriad of experiences of the average military member.  The latter is part of a bad joke.  Academia feels that military experience is not as "rigorous", yet the work-force feels that academic knowledge is almost useless.


Its a sad state of affairs really. 

lance.pierce
lance.pierce

Well hmm.  Are we doing this for all relevant work experience for non-military backgrounds too, or just giving veterans yet another leg up on those who worked civilian jobs to earn their way?

BACHRLB
BACHRLB

@jmcelroy888 I worked in the classified world while in the military and this comment is just ridiculous. Wouldn't be much of a secret if every Joe Blow could go get a degree at ITT for it....but your comment made for a good laugh this morning.

flynzy
flynzy

@jmcelroy888  The Military hasn't assigned credit to the classroom experience of veterans. The credit suggestion is done by the American Council On Education, www.acenet.edu 

I doubt your degree from ITT Tech would be considered Top Secret don't flatter yourself.

lulyreader
lulyreader

@mccoyflowersjm Actually, the issue here is not getting credit for experience, it is for getting credit for course work done in the military - like taking Anatomy and Physiology.

lulyreader
lulyreader

@lance.pierce Again, they are talking about course work done in the military, not on the job training.

flynzy
flynzy

@lance.pierce  Mot colleges will give credit for life experience, what this article is talking about is classroom experience oftentimes backed up with real world experience, sometimes with someone shooting at you.  Please feel free to enlist and get some of this experience yourself.

diggity
diggity

@lance.pierce  As a recruiter, it's very difficult most times to find a spot for a veteran based on the work experience they've gained in the military. A lot of the skills don't transfer over to office jobs. I think they should absolutely be given some type of credit for the experiences they've gained in the military. 


For the gentleman mentioned in the article, there's no reason why he shouldn't receive advanced standing for the first year or two of a nursing program, based on his background. There's still things he would need to learn, and it should be done on a case-by-case basis, not an overarching program that everyone automatically receives advanced standing, but in some cases, it's necessary. 


It's also slightly unfair to make someone who has all the skills, knowledge and practical experience spend thousands of dollars to learn something they already know, but that's another issue altogether.

jsfox
jsfox

@lance.pierce  Well hmm. if I worked as a medic in the military do you not think that training and experience should not go to course credit if say i wanted to become a nurse? So whole I may not think anyone should just be given credit they should be able to test out of a requirement.

lance.pierce
lance.pierce

@lulyreader Interesting, because this article here we're all commenting on mentions "military training and experience" and "skills learned on the battlefield" and only mentions military courses once, in a quote, as an extreme example.  Which article are you reading, I wonder?

lance.pierce
lance.pierce

@flynzy I've yet to see credits offered for impressive resumes; occasionally one can test out of prerequisites, but all students, veterans included, have always had this option when considered appropriate, and can take full advantage of it if they actually know everything they need to know.  Demonstration of skills speaks a little louder than smug self-assurance; please feel free to go to college and see.

jmcelroy888
jmcelroy888

@diggity @lance.pierce The military only teaches you what you need to know. They are not handing out Degrees.  Why is that so hard to understand for everyone.  Ok, so you want your credit. It just does not stand up. It only holds proof you did something and is on paper. That is it. In a Nut Shell.

lance.pierce
lance.pierce

@jsfox depends on the coursework.  I don't think you should get to skip required classes and prerequisites due to an insistence that you don't need them or a faulty assumption that being a civilian nurse will be exactly the same as a medic in the military.  But that's actually not the question I find most interesting: if somebody's already worked a similar job in the civilian sector, do we offer them credit too, or do veterans just want to be treated as if they chose paying for college rather than a paid military job and not have to put in the hours and money that other students do?  Because it seems to me that if we're going to start accepting relevant job experience as coursework, then there's no fair reason not to do so for everybody.

flynzy
flynzy

@lance.pierce @flynzy  no one is talking about prerequisites. They are talking about actual coursework completed in a classroom. The reporter make not be using the terminology  correctly. I hold degrees thank you.

BACHRLB
BACHRLB

@lance.pierce We put in the hours and work while serving our country and had to go to school to learn those jobs before doing them.  It's not "just giving veterans yet another leg up" like it's some sort of welfare handout.  It's not like we went to basic training and then were all the sudden medics, or communications specialists, some of us go through months and sometimes years of training 8+ hours a day, 5-7 days a week and put much more time and effort in than a college kid does.  We're not enjoying frat parties, studying at Starbuck's, or have the opportunity to fail out and just take it again.