Broadway’s ‘Book of Mormon’ Might Hit the Silver Screen

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"Book of Mormon" writers Trey Parker, Matt Stone and Roberto Lopez accept an award for best book of a musical at at 65th Annual Tony Awards in June.

This year’s breakout Broadway musical, The Book of Mormon, is expected to hit the silver screen, according to an Entertainment Weekly interview with its creators.

Trey Parker and Matt Stone, also the men behind South Park,  told EW they intend on making The Book of Mormon into a movie after taking the sold-out show on a national tour, which is slated to begin next summer in Denver, Colo.

(MORE: Book of Mormon: South Park Creators Hit Broadway)

The religious satire, which swept the 2011 Tony Awards, follows the lives of two young Mormons on a quest for converts during a missionary trip to Uganda.

After taking home nine top awards including best musical, best direction and original score at the Tony Awards in June, the Broadway sensation has been a sold-out smash hit.

Parker and Stone  looked to producer Scott Rudin, of The Social Network and No Country For Old Men fame, for help in bringing the musical to stage,  so it’s no secret he would fit the bill in taking it to the big screen.

Stone confirmed the pair definitely want to make it a movie some day, but not for several years. “The great thing is, a lot of Broadway teams would have to go team up with a Hollywood producer and bring on a Hollywood director, but Trey’s a director and Scott’s a great producer,” Stone told EW. “We’ve all made movies. So it’s kind of cool, it can stay in the same family.”

The duo are currently working on the second half of season 15 of Comedy Central’s “South Park,” which airs Oct. 5.

LIST: 10 Memorable Depictions of Mormons in Pop Culture

2 comments
benebeth
benebeth

God love ya. Don't spend it all in one place.

Channah
Channah

I am glad her father was compassionate enough to finally join the Army of the Union.  I am from the south, but, that cause was strictly in order to keep their cotton wealth by having slaves to work the fields.  Someone once argued with me that it wasn't about slavery but about economics.  Huh?  Without their slaves there would have been no cotton fields to bring in the money.