Arkansas GOP Candidates Lose Campaign Funding over Racially Charged Comments

Three GOP lawmakers have called slavery "is a blessing in disguise", called Lincoln a war criminal and called for all Muslims to be thrown out of the country.

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Image: Arkansas state representative Jon Hubbard
Arkansas Secretary of State, Lori McElroy/AP

Arkansas state representative Jon Hubbard

Three Republican lawmakers in Arkansas are in hot water following the release of their remarks about slavery, Jesus and Muslims over the weekend. The Arkansas Republican Party immediately distanced itself by denouncing their comments as offensive and pulling their campaign funding.

All three men — state representatives Jon Hubbard and Loy Mauch and candidate Charlie Fuqua — published their comments in books or blogs. Excerpts from their writings were published by online newsmagazine TalkBusiness.net and the Arkansas Times, an alternative weekly in Little Rock.

(MORE: ‘Stigma’ of Slavery Ruined America, Bob Dylan Says)

In a 2009 self-published book, Representative Jon Hubbard of Jonesboro calls slavery a “blessing in disguise” for blacks, who otherwise would have still struggled as “African tribesmen” instead of becoming the citizens of “the greatest nation” on earth.

“The institution of slavery that the black race has long believed to be an abomination upon its people may actually have been a blessing in disguise,” Hubbard argues in Letters to the Editor: Confessions of a Frustrated Conservative. “The blacks who could endure those conditions and circumstances would someday be rewarded with citizenship in the greatest nation ever established upon the face of this Earth.”

(MORE: ‘Legitimate Rape': The Best Tweets about Todd Akin’s Rape Comments)

Hubbard goes on to argue that racial integration caused the decline of the American public school system and that as a race, blacks ought to stop clinging onto a victim mentality.

House candidate Charlie Fuqua, of Batesville, Ark., wrote in his 2012 book God’s Law: The Only Political Solution that all Muslims should be expelled from the U.S. to solve “the Muslim problem,” according to the Associated Press.

In a Sept. 27 blog post titled “Christianity in Retreat,” Fuqua said that Muslims and the liberal left have some things in common: They were both “antichrists” who hoped to destroy the world by starting “violent, bloody revolutions.”

Fuqua told the AP that he was surprised by his own party’s denouncement.

“I think my views are fairly well-accepted by most people,” he said.

(MORE: Todd Akin: Rape, Abortion and the Dark History of Qualifying Violence Against Women)

Hubbard, who is running for reelection, defended himself by releasing an email to KAIT8, a local ABC affiliate, saying he was attacked by “left-wing bloggers” who took his remarks out of context.

“They attacked me because I’m a conservative,” he wrote in the email, “and they’ve taken small portions of my book out of context, and distorted what was said to make it appear that I am racist, which is totally and completely false.”(Click here to read the entire email, along with a chapter of his book.)

State Rep. Loy Mauch of Bismarck, Ark., has long made his feelings about slavery and the history of the South through his frequent letters to the editor to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, The Huffington Post reports. In a 2007 letter, Mauch described Abraham Lincoln as a “war criminal,” according to the AP. He also wrote in a 2009 letter that “Jesus Christ did condone slavery.”

(MORE: How Did a Handcuffed Arkansas Man Shoot Himself in the Head in the Back of a Police Car?)

State GOP Chairman Doyle Webb denounced the writings of all three men as “highly offensive” and said the party would no longer financially support their campaigns on Saturday, the AP reports.  On Monday Tim Griffin, who represents Arkansas’ 2nd District in the U.S. House of Representatives, demanded Mauch, Hubbard and Fuqua donate his contributions to charity instead. A fellow Arkansas Republican, Rep. Rick Crawford, called the writings “divisive and racially inflammatory.”

Jay Barth, a political science professor at Hendrix College in Conway, Ark., told Reuters that these lawmakers’ comments on race are a setback to the progress Arkansas has made since the 1960s. But the fact that not just Hubbard, but two other lawmakers also made racially charged remarks, makes Republicans look particularly bad.

MAGAZINE: Why the U.S. Is Still Fighting the Civil War

30 comments
LTCartoons
LTCartoons

I hate to break his (and his two comrade's) hearts, but I'm an Arkansas moderate conservative who had never heard of these three clowns before 3 days ago; and in a way am glad they reared their ugly heads; as we are all trying to figure out who to add to our "throw the bums out" campaign on voting day. They made it so easy; often we have to research to find out who is misbehaving (or in their cases, who is over the top fringe insane).    Ar. didn't work as hard as it has (since Bill Clinton) was in office to move from number 48 or so in education to #4 and way up the stratosphere in other areas too; only to have these clowns walk in and attempt to bully their way in.  The only problem is that Fuqua may be "Arkansas' Todd Akin" in that he was surprised the GOP was pulling funding and distancing themselves.  Usually such loons don't go public unless they feel their peers are in agreement.  What they don't know is "but not publicly".  Hence to be safe, most of us (Independents) or going for Obama for President and of course all The Democratic Reps running just to be safe.  The uber conservative St. Louis Dispatch gave Obama a glowing report, and as I thought, he's the most fiscally responsible President since IKE.  I think this new GOP Cult is going to have to tear down and start over. I can't imagine voting any of them for anything again. 

GsusFreakid
GsusFreakid

I'm "Republican" (even though BOTH political parties are sadly deficient) and this guy is evil.  Democrats and Liberals trying to pretend that all Republicans support these statements is simply erroneous. One, or in this case 3, men's radically hateful statements do not represent the vast majority of how Republicans (and Democrats) think.  He should not run for office with that kind of hate speech.

Yortal N
Yortal N

Hubbard said he was attacked by “left-wing bloggers” who took his remarks out of context. “They attacked me because I’m a conservative.”

There's that "victim mentality" he warned about!

Lloyd Cata
Lloyd Cata

...and so, as the US Supreme Court adjudicates the wisdom of 'affirmative action', it would be 'wise' for these "esteemed jurists" to reflect on the actual State of Race/Prejudice in this nation.

The 'fiction' of a post-racial America, is just that ...a fiction; based on hope, founded in the struggle for freedom, and grounded in the blood and history of our ancestors. The Dream may still live, but as Martin Luther King proclaimed from the rooftops and mountaintops of America; ~ "We have come to cash the check of Freedom and Liberty, only to find the account marked 'insufficient funds'".

There is no monetary or ethical price that can be payed for the horrors of the past. We go on! We struggle on! In the Hope for a better day ...and that day has not yet come! There will be many, many days until it does come. Years matter not on the road to Justice! Yet, given the 'entrenched ignorance' of trying to rewrite a wrong ...only prolongs the journey.

Thank you for your enlightened consideration,

Lloyd Cata

RobertSF
RobertSF

Fuqua told the AP that he was surprised by his own party’s denouncement.

I'm surprised too. The Republicans still have some limits? Who knew?

colincb
colincb

 The GOP's  limits only apply when they get caught.  Otherwise they say this racist crap all the time.

f_galton
f_galton

Speak the truth and get punished for it, that's America these days.

Danzig83
Danzig83

Mitt Romney's son, Tagg Romney, has been  engaged in a contract with a surrogate mother with the stipulations that if the child being carried was not up to the Romney's specifications, that the Romney family would have the final say if the child would be aborted or not. In other words the Romney family used their money to buy the power to end a human life, something that Mitt Romney has spoken out against vehemently in the past. 

bayman99
bayman99

They spoke what most people of all races have thought at some point.   Although an abomination to the black man's human rights,  slavery has had a positive economic and educational affect on their race.  Although not media popular opinions, they have their constitutional right to say what they believe.

Lloyd Cata
Lloyd Cata

// slavery has had a positive economic and educational affect on their race //

Really!? I'm having trouble believing it had a positive educational effect on the Caucasian Race, because actually your not doing so well either;

http://tinyurl.com/9z86ggc ...b-b-but don't let me disabuse you of the fact that;

"Your army is battered, your society is tattered, and your treasury is a joke", ...but that is not the worst! You finally have a Black man to blame all of it on...

// constitutional right to say what they believe. //

Hurrah for your Constitution that now celebrates Indefinite Detention and Summary Execution!!!

 

nowhere1111
nowhere1111

???. 'Most people of all races' have thought this?? According to YOUR 'thinking' perhaps, but I doubt it. Btw, the GOP also has a Constitutional right to not give $$ to ignorant candidates.

lnd72
lnd72

I'm an independent, but lean right because of economic issues. RNC and Republicans from other states should let guys like this know in no uncertain terms that they want no part of them even if it costs them a congressional majority in the short term.

These racist political leaders from some southern states are stuck in the past, and will cause great damage to Republicans if they are allowed to associate with them.

Kaseys Pitstop
Kaseys Pitstop

I agree with all 3 of them, there was nothing racist about what they said. Read the entire story before you comment!

Lloyd Cata
Lloyd Cata

 Slowly...repeat...after...me;

"Ignorance is popular"

...then look in the mirror, and tell me what you see...

Welch Jodie
Welch Jodie

WHY NO MENTION IN YOUR ARTICLE ABOUT FUQUA  PROMOTING THE MURDER OF CHILDREN WHO DON"T BEHAVE did you leave that out on purpose....WHY is this man allowed to run.  This is in his book too.   I am appalled that any person running for public office would be allowed to claim it is OK to murder children...what the hell is going on in Arkansas......Thank GOD I don't live there..that would never be tolerated here...NEVER.....

FootnoteFad
FootnoteFad

I've been in a few countries and I can tell you that every country has its own mullahs (this one is the case and point).  Some wear torban yet others wear suit.  Yet they all think that god has their backs.    Whether a christian, jew or a muslim, a mullah is a mullah is a mullah.

Samuel Adams
Samuel Adams

But Jesus *did* condone slavery.  Several times.  

kateslate
kateslate

Jesus did not.  Slaves were in the Old Testament.   Jesus said "As ye do unto the least of these, ye do unto me."  You can find a translation of the bible that confirms whatever your prejudices are, and it appears they are trying to rewrite the bible again in a republican voice.  RIDICULOUS! 

Lloyd Cata
Lloyd Cata

 Not so ridiculous, until we get the election results. "Ignorance is popular", and the 'true believers'(sic) have the 'fervor of righteousness' on their side!

It will take a fervent commitment to "banish ignorance" and 'education populism'(Obama, Debate#1) to combat the 'instincts of illiteracy' that permeates the airwaves.

How about 'intentionally lying' on the airwaves becoming illegal; like slander. They will argue, "Who was slandered?" ...and the answer is the American people, because the 'intent' was to brainwash "ignorant people".

RtheK
RtheK

 And that's exactly why I don't believe in Jesus.

sacredh
sacredh

I think he made terrible fashion choices.

SeattleRainn
SeattleRainn

They wear their hate like a badge of honor. It's VILE.

thinkthankthunk
thinkthankthunk

Is this what they mean by the south will rise again?

ProfessorPolecat
ProfessorPolecat

I love how Republican voters will say they aren't racist but will support people like this that thinks slavery was a blessing in disguise.

sacredh
sacredh

It's like saying you're against prostitution after you lay your money on the table and zip up.