Germany to Outlaw Sex with Animals, Finally

German lawmakers have proposed a new bill to make bestiality illegal — again.

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German lawmakers plan to introduce a new statute that will make sexual acts with animals illegal, a move that has brought a surprising amount of criticism by “zoophilia” advocates.  Under the new law, those found guilty of sexual acts with animals can be fined up to $32,000.

Which begs the question: why wasn’t this already illegal in Germany?

The short answer: It was. Bestiality had long been illegal in Germany thanks to the same penal code statute that criminalized sexual relations between men—a law that was struck down in 1969.  The German parliament will begin debating a new Animal Protection Code this week, which aims to outlaw the use of animals for “individual sexual acts,” the British Daily Mail reports.  Current bestiality laws only make the act illegal if “significant harm” is inflicted upon the animal.

Pro-animal sex group Zoophile Engagement for Tolerance and Information (ZETA) has led a campaign against the measure. “We will take legal action against this,” chairman Michael Kiok told Spiegel Online. “We see animals as partners and not as a means of gratification. We don’t force them to do anything.” Kiok has an Alsatian named Cessie.

Hans-Michael Goldmann, head of the parliamentary committee investigating the new amendment, told the AFP that the new legislation was intended to clarify the current legal position.

“With this explicit ban, it will be easier to impose penalties and to improve animal protection,” Goldmann told the German tabloid Bild.

4 comments
pudabudigada
pudabudigada

I happen to be on your side in this that I believe that bestiality is wrong, but this article is atrociously written, showing a strong bias that is quite unprofessional. In addition, the use of the hyphen in ''Pro-animal sex group'' is incorrect, The hyphen should come between 'animal' and 'sex', in order to not give the idea that this is an animal rights group which is somehow based on sex.

FredIrby
FredIrby

@dentonmc: in what way is that different to saying that homosexuality in Uganda is an unwritten taboo and therefore Draconian laws are required because elements of society don't abide to that taboo and keep straight?

Reading the newspaper articles in question, those state that the Animal Protection Code will be amended to state that no animal should be forced into "actions alien to the species," including sex with a human.By which definition it is presumably not an "action alien to the species" for livestock to be raised and killed for food long before their natural lifespan? Most arguments against bestiality are unfortunately based around such "double standards" and made without thinking through the consequences - read, for example, Michael Roberts' legal dissertation on "The Jurisprudence of Bestiality" through to its logical conclusion that legislation against bestiality only makes sense when it is written within a clearly defined "animal rights" framework which does not exist, yet.

dentonmc
dentonmc

Sad thing is that laws are only necessary when a society no longer abides by unwritten taboos.

WilliamBarnes
WilliamBarnes

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