Eric Schmidt Went to North Korea and Looked At Things [Photos]

It was the oddest of couples embarking on the most excellent of adventures: Google's executive chairman and Eric Schmidt joined Bill Richardson, the former New Mexico governor, in a three-day tour of North Korea. And there were many things to be looked at.

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It was the oddest of couples embarking on the most excellent of adventures: Google executive chairman and geek-in-chief Eric Schmidt joined politician Bill Richardson, the former New Mexico governor and one-time U.N. ambassador, in a three-day tour of North Korea. The two headed to the Hermit Kingdom on a diplomatic mission to call for greater Internet freedom and technological knowledge for the country’s 24 million people. Media access in North Korea is tightly controlled, but cameras did follow the duo around as they looked at things — as seems to be quite common in North Korea.

Eric Schmidt Looks at 3-D Glasses

Eric Schmidt, Kun Tony Namkung

David Guttenfelder / AP

Schmidt tries on a pair of 3-D glasses during a tour of the Korean Computer Center on Jan. 9, 2013.

Eric Schmidt Looks at North Korean Tablets

Former New Mexico Governor Richardson and Google Executive Chairman Schmidt visit the Korean Computer Center in Pyongyang

KCNA / Reuters

Richardson and Schmidt check out North Korean software running on tablet computers during a visit the Korean Computer Center in Pyongyang, January 9, 2013.

Eric Schmidt Looks at Computers

Eric Schmidt

David Guttenfelder / AP

Schmidt takes a picture during a tour of a computer lab at Kim Il Sung University in Pyongyang, on Jan. 8, 2013. That’s a keeper.

Eric Schmidt Looks at an IT Textbook

Eric Schmidt, Bill Richardson, Jared Cohen

David Guttenfelder / AP

Schmidt pages through a textbook titled “Aries Net+ Certified Technician First Edition Version 3.0″ at the Grand People’s Study House in Pyongyang on Jan. 9, 2013.

Eric Schmidt Looks at a Pyongyang Scenic Overlook

Eric Schmidt

David Guttenfelder / AP

Schmidt stands on a balcony at the Grand Peoples Study House near Juche Tower in Pyongyang, on Jan. 9, 2013.

Eric Schmidt Looks at TV Reporters

Eric Schmidt

Kim Kwang Hyon / AP

Schmidt is surrounded by journalists after arriving at Pyongyang International Airport in Pyongyang on Jan. 7, 2013.

4 comments
Kafantaris
Kafantaris

Hiding from the world is proof enough that the North Korean and Iranian regimes cannot withstand scrutiny even from their own people -- less they should find out that the regimes have fully succeeded in stifling economic development. Yet North Korea and Iran could just as easily have excelled economically as well as technologically -- for the greater good of their citizens. As things stand now, Iran has abandoned all paths to the country's Persian greatness, and daily North Korea has to face the glaring economic disparities with its sister state.   Exactly how long will it take for these regimes to realize that in today's world a country's might is measured in economic terms?Indeed, even if the North Korean and Iranian regimes on their own somehow managed to amass Russia's military might, neither would be further ahead economically.  So what's the point in trying?

catfitz
catfitz

Eric Schmidt didn't actually call for Internet freedom. He merely spoke in a general sort of way about how there was an economic advantage to Internet connection, and if North Korea didn't connect more, it would be "left behind".

The entire trip empowered the wrong sort in the regime -- who are in any event already connected to the Internet and have no interest in connecting anyone else.

http://3dblogger.typepad.com/wired_state/2013/01/googles-eric-schmidt-and-the-cult-of-connectivity-in-north-korea.html

Nerds-Too
Nerds-Too

So Skyfall is not a total fiction at all.

Even CIA is eyeing at nerds as new recruits. Eric, hide your radio properly.