Size Matters: Customers Sue Subway after ‘Footlong’ Sandwich Fails to Measure Up

We just don't know what we can believe in anymore.

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Scott Olson / Getty Images
Scott Olson / Getty Images

Subway’s “footlong” sandwiches are falling short of 12 inches, and customers aren’t happy.

After news that Subway has been exaggerating the size of their trademark “footlong” sandwiches, customers are now filing lawsuits against the global sandwich chain, according to Philly.com, a website associated with the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Two men in New Jersey have filed a lawsuit alleging false advertising, according to the New York Observer.   “A foot is 12 inches. They call it the ‘Footlong’, making people believe they’re getting a foot-long sandwich,” their lawyer, Stephen DeNittis, told the Observer. “If they were calling it the ‘Big Sandwich,’ or the ‘Big Kahuna,’ this case wouldn’t have been filed.”

In a separate lawsuit filed against Subway’s parent company, Doctor’s Associates Inc., a Chicago man claims that his “footlong” sandwich purchased at a Subway location near his home didn’t hit the 12-inch mark and alleges a “pattern of fraudulent, deceptive and otherwise improper advertising, sales and marketing practices,” according to the Chicago Tribune.

Both lawsuits are seeking class-action status, according to the Chicago Tribune.

(MORE: Fast-Food Chains Want You to Eat More than the Usual Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner)

The size of Subway’s sandwiches have become widely disputed recently after an Australian teen posted a photo to Facebook last week showing his “footlong” Subway sandwich was only 11 inches instead of the advertised 12.  The image sparked a wave of similar online posts by other Subway customers around the world, who claimed their sandwiches were also short of a foot, reported the Chicago Tribune.

“We have seen the photo you referenced of a Subway sandwich that looks like it doesn’t meet our standards,” a Subway spokesperson told the Huffington Post in response to the Australian teen’s photo. “We always strive for our customers to have the most positive experience possible, and we believe this was an isolated case in which the bread preparation procedures were unfortunately not followed.”

Subway issued another statement on Wednesday saying officials had not received a copy of the New Jersey men’s lawsuit and reiterating that it doesn’t comment on pending litigation, reported Philly.com.

However, the sandwich chain did say it would work harder to achieve “sandwich-length uniformity,” according to the Chicago Tribune.

(MORE: Super-Size No Longer: Subway Surpasses McDonald’s as World’s Largest Restaurant Chain)

4 comments
Comment_is_reta
Comment_is_reta

Some people just need to hold the full meaty 12 inches in their hands, and anything smaller just doesn't satisfy

LynneCampbell
LynneCampbell

The 1” difference in the bread should be the least of anyone’s concerns.What you SHOULD be concerned about is the ingredients used in their breads.Their bread contains L-cysteine.L-cysteine is derived from either duck feathers, hog hair, or worse…human hair.Human hair is mainly used in products from China, but is used in the US as well.For all the vegetarians who thought Subway was safe….wrong.It is blatant false advertising.I’m sure that meat-eaters also didn’t know they were eating such disgusting ingredients when Subway has made billions claiming their food was healthy.

Ibvook
Ibvook

But what are they expecting? Multi-million dollar compensation?

GeneTrotsky
GeneTrotsky

@LynneCampbell  Like to point out that your body depends on L-Cysteine. While you are free to disagree with how it is obtained there is nothing disgusting about the ingredient itself and it is found in many vegetables. Also why the hell do you care if it is made from human hair? I can understand the opposition to feathers and hog as cruelty to animals, but human hair? Using human hair causes no harm to anybody, plus it's essentially recycling.