Duke University Fraternity Suspended over Asian-Themed ‘Racist Rager’

Kappa Sigma Fraternity hosted an Asian-themed party that sparked outrage among the university community for being racist

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Duke University

The Kappa Sigma Fraternity at Duke University in Durham, N.C., was suspended by its parent organization after throwing an Asian-themed party — replete with conical hats, geisha outfits and intentional misspellings — sparking protests by Asian students on campus.

According to the school’s newspaper, the Duke Chronicle, the university’s Asian American Alliance organized the Wednesday-afternoon rally, which more than 900 people said they would attend, in order to highlight anti-Asian prejudice at Duke.

(MORE: Minority Students in Texas Allegedly Hit with Racially Motivated ‘Bleach Bomb’ Attacks)

The Feb. 1 event, initially called Kappa Sigma Asia Prime, was announced via e-mail invitations that included stereotypical misspellings like herro and chank you and an image from the film Team America: World Police, according to Yahoo! News.

The off-campus party was later renamed International Relations after a report was filed with the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life at the university, Gawker reported.

Several photos from the party, which the Asian American Alliance dubbed the “racist rager,” were posted on Facebook and used in fliers around campus on Monday in protest. However, Kappa Sigma members had removed most of posters by late afternoon, according to Gawker.

The fraternity is being investigated to determine the status of its charter. In the meantime, all activities and events at the fraternity have been prohibited until the investigation is complete and the findings of the probe are reviewed, according to the Associated Press.

According to the Duke Chronicle, the university formally recognized Kappa Sigma last year after a 10-year hiatus; the fraternity dissolved and moved off campus in the face of sanctions from the national organization in 2002.

MORE: Why We Still Need Affirmative Action

49 comments
smokesiniztr
smokesiniztr

forget assimilation, it's time for domination!

smokesiniztr
smokesiniztr

it's time we realize the war is not over

listen2yourconscience
listen2yourconscience

As a graduate of Duke University AND an African American woman who happens to teach AMERICAN history at a university, I am appalled! This theme party and others are unthinkable and objectionable behavior ANYWHERE--much less on a college campus, which are supposed to be places where the most evolved minds are. And to Mr.Bomb13 and all the others who have suggested this is "just fun" or "protected free speech," you ought to be ashamed of yourselves for defending racism!! Who defends RACISM, but a RACIST?!!And let me be clear this IS RACIST!! I speak not only as a woman who has been victimized by such behavior personally-- on and off of campus, but also as an expert on American History and its unique and troubling kind of RACISM. I am afraid that many of you think this is fun. Since when has fun in America been at the expense of those who have a history of exclusion, segregation, and oppression? Are you serious? Is that how we define fun?!! Would it also be fun to have a "White women" party with people wearing blond wigs and fake boobs and talking in what they think are white girl accents--with signs saying, "we love black men?!" Those are all stereotypes. We all have stereotypes, but EDUCATED people work hard not to play them out on a college campus or workspace. EDUCATED and EVOLVED people just do not harm others in their community for the sake of "fun." Its this SAME mentality (we can do anything to have fun) that justified lynching. Those lynch mobs had fun too. Thousands of pictures depict how much fun they had smiling and laughing while black men and women swung from trees. IJS...To all people of color: Just because it is happening to Asians does not mean it is any less racist than if these party goers had put on black face. To the Asian Communities: I understand why this hurts because I know the history of Asian Americans broadly in this country and how Asian endured forced labor on railroads, race riots, segregation, internment camps, and odious legislation like the Chinese Exclusion Act. I just encourage all Asians also to stand in solidarity with African Americans and Latinos the next time they endure something like this.   To Duke admissions: Please stop accepting those who are so narrow-minded and have no real experience with diversity. Unless you want to keep recreating this culture at Duke (which drags the name of my alma mater into the mud), you need radical change there. Admissions is ground zero. Let them go to Scranton or wherever Mrbomb13 just got his degree from. Finally to President Brodhead: Time to step down. You have not managed this well. Duke University should have acted on this immediately; It should not have taken action by Kappa Sig's national headquarters. Duke should have responded LONG BEFORE anyone else! Duke needs to address this with re-EDUCATION of the entire student body. It needs to be led by the school's President. Your lack of response says a lot about you...Why would anyone send their child to a school where a president remains mum? 

GeorgeHung
GeorgeHung

Perhaps reach out to the VP of Student Affairs:

Dr. Larry Moneta, Vice President for Student Affairs
102 Flowers Building
404 Chapel Drive
Box 90959
Durham, NC 27708
Office Phone: 919-684-3737
Fax: 919-681-7873
studentaffairs@duke.edu

Ocsicnarf
Ocsicnarf

Cinema is full of racist remarks. Bias against blacks and Hispanics seem now enough politically incorrect, but Asians are now fair game. Should they? No, of course.

brulat
brulat

Idiotic. I'm in a predominantly white frat and I am black. Something like this would NEVER happen at our house. Funny, the Asians wouldn't say a word if the party was black face. Asians are very insulated and only care about themselves. Regardless, a "ethnic themed" anything serves no purpose as far as uniting people. None.

jerry48
jerry48

if  it's only fun why don't they make fun of themselves ? I am sure they can find pretty good material in N.C. or in the rest of the South ! of course this is racist ! period !

ksjeffrey
ksjeffrey

How ridiculous the politically correct media has become. Theme parties are fun, and can be very creative and entertaining if done well. What has happened too this country? People are hyper-sensitive, and the media just stokes that uber-ridiculous sensitivity. Lighten up and have some fun!

luissaavedra
luissaavedra

This is ridiculous, I am in a fraternity, I am Hispanic, and in 5 de Mayo I have no problem playing with the joke.

IrishImmigrant
IrishImmigrant

For those of you who haven’t heard the story yet, last week a fraternity at Duke held a party that’s been getting some attention. The original theme of the party was “Asia Prime,” a pun on the chapter’s name, Eta Prime. After the invitations had been sent, the fraternity was reported to Duke’s Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life. In response, the fraternity sent out a second invitation, changing the name of the party to “International Relations” and issuing an apology for anyone who might have been offended by the original theme. However, the actual party stuck largely to the original theme. Partygoers dressed as geishas, ninjas, sumo wrestlers, and a plethora of other Asian stereotypes.

Pictures of the party were made available on social media and were posted around campus by offended students who sought to start a campus dialogue on racism. They also posted on Facebook and other social media outlets about what had happened, which eventually led to national media attention. In response, some of you may be thinking that Duke might not be the school for you.

If so, I want to challenge you on that. The attention Duke has attracted because of this event is not a product of the severity of the fraternity’s offense. The reason why we have attracted so much attention is because of our reaction to it, which stems from our university’s commitment to diversity and a welcoming and inclusive environment.

Racism is not a problem specific to Duke. Racist party themes are not a problem specific to Duke fraternities. This is a problem that affects American universities and America in general. None of the costumes worn by students at the party were difficult to find. They were available at any party store. Racism in varying degrees is still exceedingly common in our world.

What is not so common is the courage that our community displayed in the face of what so many have become passive about. There has been huge support for the Asian American community, a rally of several hundred students demanding a more inclusive culture on campus in the middle of a week full of midterms, and a meaningful discussion not just about one fraternity or one party but about a larger culture of privilege and oppression.

So when you see Duke’s name alongside words like “racist” and “rager” in headlines and the twittersphere, remember that the reason why is because of the progress we are making and the steps we are taking, rather than the problems we face.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

Whatever happened to free speech on-campus?  More generally, whatever happened to being able to take a joke?

When I was in college (2006-2010), those kinds of parties happened all the time.  People of different races/ethnicities acknowledged that it was a joke, and played along.

Following this line of logic, I guess colleges/universities should ban Halloween parties, as many costumes paint an exaggerated picture of those they represent.  Furthermore, perhaps theme parties in general should be banned, as some minority group is bound to take offense.

Quite frankly, banning the fraternity constitutes a ridiculous reaction on the part of Duke.  It truly displays the limits of "tolerance" on a college campus.  No one was maliciously attacking Asians/Asian-Americans; no one meant them any harm.  Yet, the moment anyone claims "offense," everyone becomes intolerant of such opinions.  

I hope the fraternity is allowed back on Duke campus.  When I think of how the university over-reacted, I think of how my friends (many of them minorities) and myself would have been unfairly punished.  All of us were hard-working students who now hold stable jobs.  With that kind of a "punishment" on our records, it would have severely hurt our job potential.  

Duke should be thinking more about the long-term repercussions of their prematurely assigned punishment.

FrankHarrington
FrankHarrington

Look, Duke University has nothing to hide, nothing for which to apologize.  Come on there is racism throughout the world, black on white, white on black, brown on yellow, etc.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@listen2yourconscience

(continued)

3) As someone who claims to be an expert on race relations, I don't need to remind you how most Americans once thought it was "fun" to disparage and denigrate Blacks, Asians, Hispanics (etc.).  The intention of the frat party was anything but.

4) "Are you serious? Is that how we define fun?!! Would it also be fun to have a "White women" party with people wearing blond wigs and fake boobs and talking in what they think are white girl accents--with signs saying, "we love black men?!" Those are all stereotypes. We all have stereotypes, but EDUCATED people work hard not to play them out on a college campus or workspace. EDUCATED and EVOLVED people just do not harm others in their community for the sake of "fun.""

Actualy, yes, I'm serious.  In fact, much of the college/university-aged crowd out there is quite serious too.  The "White women" parties you mention occur on college campuses across the country too.  That's what makes for a "theme party" - the exaggeration of stereotypes.  Of course, it's understood that zero racist/malicious intention is present, and such intention is never tolerated.  

5) As a Duke University academic, I would challenge you to provide any and all evidence that the frat house's behavior justified an attitude towards lynching, and any of the other malicious behaviors directed at minorities.  It's fundamentally unfair and misleading to portray the frat as in way reminiscent of those who supported such racial discrimination, segregation, etc..  

6) "To Duke admissions: Please stop accepting those who are so narrow-minded and have no real experience with diversity. Unless you want to keep recreating this culture at Duke (which drags the name of my alma mater into the mud), you need radical change there. Admissions is ground zero."
How exactly would Duke judge whether a candidate is "narrow-minded," and/or has "experience with diversity?"  What "radical change" would you propose?  What would those metrics look like?

7) Your insult against my alma mater (The University of Scranton) is unjustified, unsubstantiated, and poorly conceived for someone who alleges to be a University academic.  How dare you insinuate that racism is acceptable on my campus, because it is most certainly not.  When we held theme parties, there was a strict understanding of where "the line" of acceptable behavior was among us and those who attended.  The same was true for other on-campus parties as well.

8) "Duke needs to address this with re-EDUCATION of the entire student body."
How exactly would you define "re-education?"  Surely, it would not be like the "Re-education Camps" in 1970s Communist China?  Surely, such "re-education" would bolster the responsibilities that accompany pro-free speech attitudes on an American college campus?  Or, would such re-education hammer away at dissenting opinions and attitudes, and impose severe intolerance against those who push the limits?  How would such a reaction be in sync with our history?  Perhaps you would be so kind as to explain. 

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@listen2yourconscience

I could not help but notice that you twice referred to me in your comment.  As a fellow History teacher, it is my responsibility to respond to each of your critical points.  With that being said, in response:

1) "This theme party and others are unthinkable and objectionable behavior ANYWHERE--much less on a college campus, which are supposed to be places where the most evolved minds are."

The theme party held at Duke is far from "unthinkable."  In fact, such parties have been common for decades at schools across the country.  Regarding "objectionable," there are certainly many who would share that opinion.  However, "many" does not necessarily mean "most" (>50%).  The opposition side rightly claims that the frat house is entitled to free speech, which our nation's universities are also supposed to espouse and advocate (no matter how offensive).  That's what separates America from communist countries (i.e. Russia, China) which jail its citizens for whatever it deems to be "unapproved dissent."  Also, higher academia doesn't necessarily contain the "most evolved minds" in the human race.  In fact, some with a college/university education have put that knowledge to ill use.  As a history teacher at Duke, you should already know that.

2) Before you engage in mudslinging by labeling me (and others of similar thought) "racists," consider the intentions of the frat party.  As even you conceded, it was a theme party, meant to attract other party-goers (and generally end up drunk by night's end; so much for "evolved"...).  No malice or foul rhetoric was spewed, and no hatred of other races was propagated.  If anything, the frat was aiming at a night filled with drinking, which everyone could enjoy.  Again, at an American institution dedicated to free speech (and drinking), this should be a non-issue - especially for an American History teacher.


mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@Ocsicnarf 

Maybe you don't remember older movies, but Asians have been portrayed in ways that we would now deem "racist" (i.e. exaggerated accents, an emphasis on knowledge of martial arts, holding jobs more akin to the 'coolie' era, etc.).

MattCarlin
MattCarlin

@brulatYou sound just as bigoted as the people throwing the party.  I'm a proud Korean American and care about other races besides my own.  To generalize that all Asians only care about themselves is a complete joke.  I have friends of all races and am equally offended at jokes or slurs that pertains to them.

chulk90
chulk90

@brulat Sorry, but what is idiotic is your argument. Just because you're in a chapter that has accpeting-culture doesn't mean that value is universal at all chapters. If you're really in a fraternity and have visited other chapters, then you should know that a chapter at NYU has a very different culture than a chapter at Tulane, for example. An annecdotal account can't be used to argue for your argument. Plus, your anecdotal account itself is flawed.

Also, what's your evidence for "Asians wouldn't say a word if the party was black face?" When the black face incident happened at UF, I know that many Asians across the nation joined the debate and condemned the members.

luissaavedra
luissaavedra

@jerry48 My fraternity, a traditionally "white" nationally, (school in Florida) also makes fun of the southern stereotypes! Such as "Redneck socials"

MattCarlin
MattCarlin

@ksjeffrey Really?  Had this been a "slave" themed party or a "holocaust" themed party this story would have been covered for days on the national news.  Theme parties that aren't mocking a race are fun and can be creative if done in a tasteful way.  Had the frat decided on a ninja theme or samurai theme that would have been ok.  They decided on making fun of Asian stereotypes which is offensive.  Maybe if you had been forced to grow up with prejudice in your life you would think differently and not tell people to lighten up.  I'm a proud Korean American and cannot stand people who have never had to deal with racism daily tell others to "get over it" or "lighten up".  It's 2013 we as Americans need to stand up and embrace our diverse country and not make fun of differences.

chulk90
chulk90

@ksjeffrey Sure... and some people at the University of Florida decided to have blackface makeup at a theme party because all blacks are either "singers or dancers".

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@IrishImmigrant 

You must be kidding.

Theme parties (like the one at Duke) happen all across America at universities large and small.  The intent is not racism or race-bashing.  People need to stop being so hyper-sensitive, because the partiers meant absolutely no harm by it.  

After all, isn't higher education meant to espouse the best of democratic ideals, including free speech?  Isn't suppression of non-malicious theme parties in complete contradiction of what the "tolerance of differing opinions" which academia is supposed to espouse?

rawreader
rawreader

@mrbomb13 "people of different races" played along. Is that so? I don't know your ethnicity or race, but let me tell you something--you think racist stereotypes are all in good fun when these students often have to confront stereotypes all the time?  I don't know what campus you went to, but I seriously doubt all the students were laughing with you. And the ones who were? A few of them were lying to you. And here's the thing--would these students want any future Asian employers to see them doing that? I wouldn't mind if someone saw me with a drink in my hand or my Halloween costume, but if you have to explain to someone that you are not disrespecting them when you're doing something, that's a sign you need to rethink it. And here's what i just don't get. I get through MY life without throwing parties that make fun of other races, poor people, or disabled people. My friends and I have a perfectly good time. Why is that so hard? Seriously? I don't get it.

JohnQ74
JohnQ74

Please read up on the facts. The fraternity is under suspension by its own parent organization, not the university. The majority of students are upset not because of costumes but because of the ignorant rhetoric the fraternity members used to promote the party. “Herro” and “Chank You,” come to mind. 

Another reason people are so upset is because they don't like being told to "calm down" and to "learn how to take a joke" and hearing from folks who are generally mis-characterizing why some are upset. If you don't have anything constructive to say  then don't say it. If you're truly about free speech then let those who are upset speak their mind. If you think it's stupid then say so after understanding the facts and arguments from both sides.



anonymousse
anonymousse

@mrbomb13 Maybe these students should have given any thought at all about the damage to their job potential before perpetuating ignorant racial stereotypes. While this may be a joke and a passing thought to you, for some people this is what they have to deal with every day of their life.

jkjkhardcore
jkjkhardcore

@mrbomb13 @listen2yourconscience why condone racism in any shape or form? It's hatred that leads to many problems including violence. Freedom of speech is one thing, but freedom to instigate fights is another.

Ocsicnarf
Ocsicnarf

@mrbomb13 @Ocsicnarf Yes I remember that disgust. What I meant was that racism against some groups seem now politically incorrect, but all kinds of racism such as the cases you rise (funny accents, lack of intelligence, etc.) should be banned. Nobody is racially or ethnically superior to any other.

ksjeffrey
ksjeffrey

@MattCarlin @ksjeffrey Listen here Asian boy, I am a 50+ year old gay man, and I understand prejudice quite well. I have fought so much prejudice over the past 30 years that I am now quite comfortable in my own skin, and I don't get whiny-faced, scream like a wounded dog and threaten a lawsuit every time I get my feelings hurt. 

If the politically-correct crybabies were to win, the rest of us will be forced to live in a sanitized, white-washed world devoid of color and fun (like uptight Republicans). No thank you.

I recommend that you dress up in some cool geisha girl drag, put on some long eyelashes and heels, and try and get over yourself. It will be fun, I guarantee you. I wish I could be there to do it with you, in fact. I used to be a "rice queen" years ago. I LOVE Asian boys. But my lover of 12 years is a beaner (Mexican) and he would definitely not approve. 

chulk90
chulk90

@mrbomb13 @IrishImmigrant Freedom of speech is only guaranteed and respected as long as it does not damage others' rights. And yes, there have been many theme parties across American colleges, and I attend those parties too. Most of them are based on light-hearted jokes, but some of them do cross the boundary. Remember the "rappers" party at the University of Florida last October? People showed up wearing blackface because all blacks are "rockstars" or "rappers." By punishing the students, the university demonstrated where the boundary was.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@rawreader @mrbomb13 

To set the record straight, I am White, and I attended King's College in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  For graduate school, I attended The University of Scranton.  However, my network of friends and colleagues from childhood, college, grad school, and work is very diverse, and I take great pride in knowing such fine individuals.

Now, as it relates to the article, I will highlight my friends from college and grad school.  To be clear, many of them endured anywhere from mere taunting to outright discrimination.  However, around me and my other friends, they never endured such offensive behavior.  

Even still, around campus, there were a multitude of parties themed after the one at Duke.  Yet, it was understood that such parties were held in a joking manner, and everyone attending understood that outright racism was fully intolerable.  With that established, everyone was able to have a good time (at least while I was there).

To concede, while many of the party-goers were laughing with us (and vice-a-versa), there were some laughing at us too.  However, that "laughing at us" was more due to the alcohol and atmosphere of general drunkenness.  If the ones laughing at us were "lying," there wasn't much we could do about that.  The general feel was that such parties were all around a great time.

Regarding "Asian employers," only those who were dumb enough to post suggestive photos online ran the risk of being called out.  Truthfully, I don't think those kids were affected, since the vast majority of them have been working for the 3 years since we graduated.  It also helps that colleges told us dozens of times to scrub Facebook, Twitter (etc.) of all suggestive content before interviewing, so we were repeatedly warned.

Lastly, that's great that you've never thrown a suggestively-themed party.  The reason why college kids do it is to "live for the moment" (i.e. have that awesome party that every one talks about on Monday).  They do it for attention, knowing full well that it will get attention.  Call it immature/premature thinking, but that's college youth for you.  Eventually, kids grow up, and start throwing more 'mature parties.'  Soon enough, these Duke frat boys will too.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@JohnQ74

In all fairness, you're 100% correct:  I was wrong to state that the University suspended the frat; only the parent organization did.  My apologies for stating it incorrectly.

Second, are you insinuating that I'm "generally mis-characterizing why some are upset?"  If so, you're going to have to do better than, "If you don't have anything constructive to say  then don't say it."

Third, I am truly about free speech, and I have no problem with the opposition voicing their concerns.  What I do have a problem with is the banishment of the frat group for holding a party that was aimed at having fun (and not maliciously bashing any race).  If you think that anyone was aiming to tear down Asians (and not playing their 10th game of beer pong), than you need to get out more.  Frat parties are about drinking, not denigrating.  Universities are supposed to be hallmarks of free speech, and it seems like free speech was violated by banishing the frat house.



mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@anonymousse @mrbomb13 

"Ignorant racial stereotypes."  I strongly doubt the frat boys were 'ignorant' when they attached the old racial stereotypes to their party theme.  Instead, they were trying to generate and attract further attention to the party.  The goal was to have a good time by mocking the stereotypes, instead of maliciously embracing them.  There is a stark difference between the two.

Also, I'm not bashing the people who experience racism on a daily basis.  However, there was no racist intention with this party.  People need to calm down, accept frat boy behavior as it happens.  Again, I promise that this happens across the country, and one story like this will not stop them from occurring.

jkjkhardcore
jkjkhardcore

@mrbomb13 @jkjkhardcore @listen2yourconscience  

1. Yes I would take offense, yes I have taken offense. There have been cases where these offenses have been punished, and justifiably so. Oh and the US is not as special as you would like to think, but that is a different subject altogether.

2. Can you prove that they didn't? Does it really matter? The hatred that I am talking about is the racism which may be defined as the hatred of one person of another.

3.  You speak of the 1st as if you know of it. You obviously don't. 

Remember you can't yell FIRE in a building, you can't defame or slander, Obscenity and limitations of copyright also apply. Instigation is also a limit to the 1st.

jkjkhardcore
jkjkhardcore

@mrbomb13 @jkjkhardcore @listen2yourconscience  

1. Yes.

2. Racism = bad, whether intentionally or not. If I thought it was fun to cut off your head would that be ok if I didn't have hatred behind as a motivation?

3. I think the vet should beat the crap outta you. As for our justice system and the rights to sue or not to sue, I'm no lawyer. But depending on where you go there is a certain amount of racism that is tolerable or not. But in the US there are limitations to the 1st amendment, whether or not I agree I can understand why they have them. They are : Incitement, false statement of fact, child pornogrphy, threats, Obsenity, Speech owned by others, Offensive words / fighting words & commercial speech.

There is the freedom to speak, and the instigation and provocation that is unacceptable by US law and society as a whole.

While if you are with a friend and they don't mind, or if someone doesn't mind then that is fine. But you are a frat house at a university that DOES mind then you should follow the rules. 

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@jkjkhardcore @mrbomb13 @listen2yourconscience

First, thank you for your reply.  Just a couple of comments:

1) "why condone racism in any shape or form?"

"In any shape or form?"  So, would you take offense at TV shows and movies that even portray the slightest accent/cultural stereotype - both intended and unintended?  Would that offense be punishable?  Would such a punishment conform with Free Speech principles that set America apart from the rest of the world?

2) Can you prove that the Duke party contained even a milligram of the "hatred" that you claim causes violence?

3) "Freedom of speech is one thing, but freedom to instigate fights is another."

Interesting viewpoint.  If I burned the American flag in plain sight of a military veteran, should he have the right sue me?  Should I be held liable for legal damages for attempting to "instigate a fight?"  

To give you the answer, legal precedent has established that I have the right to make many kinds of incendiary remarks.  That precedent flows from protections found under the Free Speech clause of the First Amendment.  


squidibles
squidibles

@ksjeffrey Being gay does not grant you impunity from racial intolerance or insensitivity.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@chulk90 @mrbomb13 @IrishImmigrant 

I'm sorry, but I don't see how a 'frat party' can "damage other's rights."  Nobody is requiring other students to attend the function.  In fact, attendance is fully optional, and other students (if they find the theme offensive) may choose to ignore it.  If the opponents were more creative, they might put together a party mocking the allegedly ignorant frat house.

Furthermore, I would challenge you to define the "boundary" of acceptable v. unacceptable party themes.  You say that "Black face" is outright wrong, but provide no substantiation for as to why.  Instead, you exposed the ignorance of the partiers, as 1) many rock stars are White, and 2) there are White rappers (see:  Eminem).

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@jbanner @mrbomb13 @JohnQ74 

Logically, you would be correct, since:

1) Togas were worn by the Ancient Greeks (among other cultures), and "toga parties" is denigrating to those Greeks who prize their heritage.

2) Mariachis are well-known to Hispanics and other Spanish-/Portuguese-speaking peoples.  Such mockery of a hallmark of their civilization would be unacceptable.

3) English Tea Parties...hmmm...unless the "tea" was Twisted Tea (or some other liquor combination), I don't think a tea party would be very popular.  Still, it would indeed be offensive to the English.

Gotta love political correctness...

jbanner
jbanner

@mrbomb13 @JohnQ74  

Damn, no more toga parties, no more mariachi parties, no more english tea parties.

 

anonymousse
anonymousse

@mrbomb13 @anonymousse

There are many, but here are few. To be quite honest, I'm not very interested in continuing this discussion. You will either approach these with an open mind or you won't. I don't want to entangle myself further if you won't, and if you do have an open mind about it, then I am glad to have presented another viewpoint for you to consider. Thanks and have a great day!

http://www.gnxp.com/MT2/archives/004079.html

"The Opportunity Costs of Affirmative Action

A new paper, ,"The Opportunity Cost of Admission Preferences at Elite Universities," quantifies the effect that eliminating racial preferences would have on the demographics of elite universities. The advertised conclusions come as no surprise to me: (1) it would greatly reduce the number of black and Hispanic students and (2) it would not greatly increase the admit rate for white students. What blows me away is the effect on Asian admissions: 80% of the spaces taken by affirmative action would go to Asian students.

Disregarding race in college admissions would cause sharp drops in the number of black and Hispanic students at elite institutions, according to a new study by two researchers at Princeton University.

The study, described in an article published in the June issue of Social Science Quarterly, also found that eliminating affirmative action would significantly raise the number of Asian-American students, while having little effect on white students.

If affirmative action were eliminated, the acceptance rates for black applicants would fall to 12.2 percent from 33.7 percent, while the acceptance rates for Hispanic applicants would drop to 12.9 percent from 26.8 percent, according to the study. Asian-American students would fill nearly 80 percent of the spaces not taken by black and Hispanic students, the researchers found, while the acceptance rate for white students would increase by less than 1 percent.

The researchers who conducted the study -- Thomas J. Espenshade, a professor of sociology, and Chang Y. Chung, a statistical programmer at Princeton's Office of Population Research -- looked at the race, sex, SAT scores, and legacy status, among other characteristics, of more than 124,000 applicants to elite colleges.

"The most important conclusion is the negative impact on African-American and Hispanic students if affirmative-action practices were eliminated," Mr. Espenshade said in a written statement.

Stephen H. Balch, president of the National Association of Scholars, which opposes racial preferences in admissions, said the study's findings revealed that affirmative-action policies are "about discrimination."

"That it's Asian students who bear the brunt of affirmative-action policies at elite institutions strikes me as an interesting finding in and of itself," Mr. Balch said.

As a liberal white guy who's gone thru the elite college admissions process, I was generally okay with the idea of elite whites screwing a fraction of poor whites out of spots at the top schools. From a liberal point of view, this might be an acceptable trade-off. But what moral sense can be made of white elites screwing Asian students to pay the price of racial good-will? This should offend liberal sensibilities."

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.0038-4941.2005.00303.x/abstract;jsessionid=A3C20E4E102EA4B51962B90AC0CAB0CF.d01t03

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/04/education/edlife/affirmative-action-a-complicated-issue-for-asian-americans.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

"Admissions offices at elite institutions followed the government’s lead. They did so, according to John Skrentny, a sociologist at the University of California, San Diego, partly because the country was on fire about race and class. Increased admission to students of color was one way to quiet their campuses — and to enhance the educational experience. Within a couple of decades, the academic success of many Asian-Americans resulted in elite schools quietly keeping their numbers from climbing too high. (The mean SAT score of Asian-Americans is now 63 points higher than that of whites.)

“If you look at the Ivy League, you will find that Asian-Americans never get to 20 percent of the class,” said Daniel Golden, author of “The Price of Admission” and editor at large for Bloomberg News. “The schools semiconsciously say to themselves, ‘We can’t have all Asians.’ ” Mr. Golden says it is helpful to think of Asians as the new Jews because some rules of college admissions, like geographic diversity, were originally aimed at preventing the number of Jews from growing too high."

http://www.washingtonian.com/blogs/capitalcomment/books/is-affirmative-action-hurting-the-students-its-meant-to-help.php

"Are any students disproportionately excluded by racial preferences?

ST: Asian students. What happens is across the board of American education, Asians on average perform better than any other racial group, in high school and in college. And since racial preferences tend to drive toward proportional representation of each group, when you say we’ve got to have more blacks or Hispanics, somebody has to go. It’s a zero-sum game."

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444799904578050901460576218.html


mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@anonymousse @mrbomb13

As someone who has researched "affirmative action programs" (and their effects) for well over a decade, I would be highly interested in the studies which show that, "white males (or white females) are actually not the demographic hurt most by affirmative action."

Would you please be so kind as to provide the link for those studies?  Thank you.

anonymousse
anonymousse

@mrbomb13 @anonymousse 

I am, in fact, aware that white males face discrimination. I never said that they didn't. I said that white males are not discriminated against to the extent that males (and females) of other races are. It may surprise you that white males (or white females) are actually not the demographic hurt most by affirmative action. 

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@anonymousse @mrbomb13 

First, thank you for your clarification on "ignorant racial stereotypes."  I agree with the entire first paragraph of your reply.

Also, I'm not trying to trivialize the reactions of others.  I'm just injecting the usual "this sort of thing happens frequently, so don't be surprised" reality into the discussion.  That comment was meant for TIME Magazine, not for you.

Lastly, it may surprise you, but White males indeed face discrimination.  In college/university and job interviews, we face what's known as Reverse Discrimination.  That comes about through "affirmative action programs," which mandate that mandates racial diversity.  Essentially, it sets aside positions for minorities, just because they are minorities.  I ask you - how is that fair to Whites?  We would not qualify as "diversity," because of our skin color.  Sheer hypocrisy.

anonymousse
anonymousse

@mrbomb13 @anonymousse

Please read carefully. I did not state that the frat boys were ignorant.  At least you got the quote correct: 'ignorant racial stereotypes' - this means that the words 'ignorant' and 'racial' are descriptors for 'stereotypes,' not 'frat boys.' On the contrary, I don't think that they are ignorant. Which is even more sad that they can't hide behind ignorance as an excuse.

No one is denying that this happens across the country. But since this is the story in the news, it's the one attracting all the attention. Please stop trying to trivialize the reactions of other people. Especially when you, as a white male, have not been discriminated against like they have. They are entitled to their opinions too. And you are not entitled to dictate whether or not they should be offended.