Is ‘Accidental Racist’ Accidentally Racist? Brad Paisley and LL Cool J’s Track Makes Waves

Country crooner Brad Paisley tackles racism in his new song, with a decidedly mixed reception.

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48th Annual Academy Of Country Music Awards - ACM Fan Jam After Party
Mark Davis/ACMA2013 / Getty Images for ACM

Musician Brad Paisley performs onstage during the 48th Annual Academy Of Country Music Awards - ACM Fan Jam After Party at Orleans Arena on April 7, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

To the man that waited on me at the Starbucks down on Main, I hope you understand

When I put on that t-shirt, the only thing I meant to say is I’m a Skynyrd fan.

That’s how country singer Brad Paisley begins his new song “Accidental Racist,” an earnest tune Paisley ostensibly wrote as a means of helping to heal the nation’s continuing racial tensions. But with lyrics that appear to gloss over the South’s painful legacy of racism and slavery — although they’re probably sung with the best of intentions — the track is raising plenty of eyebrows. “Accidental Racist” appears on Paisley’s ninth studio album Wheelhouse, which debuts today; the video appears to have been pulled from the Internet, however. You can read the lyrics here.

Paisley maintains that his heart is in the right place. “This isn’t a stunt. This isn’t something that I just came up with just to be sort of shocking or anything like that,” he told Entertainment Weekly. “I knew it would be, but I’m sort of doing it in spite of that, really.”

(MORE: Red Carpet Star-Gazing at The Academy of Country Music Awards)

The chorus of “Accidental Racist” reads:

I’m just a white man comin’ to you from the south land tryin’ to understand what it’s like not to be.
I’m proud of where I’m from but not everything we’ve done. It ain’t like you and me can rewrite history.
Our generation didn’t start this nation. We’re still pickin’ up the pieces, walkin’ on eggshells, fightin’ over yesterday.
Caught between southern pride and southern blame.

The song features a guest appearance by LL Cool J, shown in the video wearing a New York Yankees cap, whose verses includes the lyrics, “If you don’t judge my do-rag/I won’t judge your red flag.” and “If you don’t judge my gold chains/I’ll forget the iron chains.”

“This is a very sensitive subject, and we’re trying to have the discussion in a way that it can help,” Paisley told Entertainment Weekly. I just think art has a responsibility to lead the way, and I don’t know the answers, but I feel like asking the question is the first step, and we’re asking the question in a big way. How do I show my Southern pride? What is offensive to you?”

Unfortunately for Paisley, the Internet’s answer to that second question appears to be, “this song.”

The Huffington Post said “Accidental Racist” “will probably make you cringe.” The Atlantic Wire opined that “There is no way Paisley was actually unaware that wearing the Confederate flag is a symbol of racism. He just does not believe it should be.” Commenters at Rap Genius, a website devoted to transcribing and interpreting rap lyrics, have done a fairly hilarious job annotating Paisley and LL’s lyrics. And Gawker, meanwhile, simply called the track a “horrible song.”

Paisley, for his part, is sticking to his guns. “I wouldn’t change a thing,” he tweeted.

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109 comments
charlestonbro69
charlestonbro69

The Confederate flag is not a symbol of racism, it's a symbol of Southern pride. The war was not fought over slavery but over states' rights. The liberal textbook writers, liberal media, and many liberal brainwashers disguised as public teachers have led people to think the war was fought over slavery. If the war was fought over slavery, Lincoln would have freed the slaves much earlier than he did.

IJR
IJR

@charlestonbro69 While there are certainly more complex nuances when it comes down to why the war was fought, you must admit that slavery and the battle for control of congress between free and slave states was the initial catalyst.  Education is liberalizing, but it doesn't mean that they are lying or as you put it "brainwashing." to be frank you seem to be the one who has been brainwashed. I'm sure you were also raised in this culture, but that doesn't make it right. The Stars and Bars is a racist icon, there is no denying that. Also side note: The majority of Textbooks are produced in Texas, not exactly a liberal bastion... If you remember the scandal from a few years ago, the contents of textbooks produced in Texas was heavily influenced by a board of mostly conservatives who pushed them through at all costs. 

You sir do not know what you are talking about,

-Ignatius J. Reilly 

adkmt
adkmt

I like this song. I'm Southern and German. I can speak fluent German with a Southern drawl. On one side, I have people who fought for the Confederacy and on the other there were Nazis. I'm not proud of that at all. However, I am proud of where I came from and how far my family has come. I married a wonderful Jewish man and have the most beautiful biracial niece ever. When I do have kids I will teach them about the past and that we have moved away from that. I want my kids to grow up loving people for who they are not their skin tone, religion, or sexuality.

HughBeaumont
HughBeaumont

@adkmt - If you take away their skin tone, religion and sexuality, what's left to love?

maxdout10
maxdout10

to those of you saying the confederate stands for slavery- you're wrong.  around the time of the civil war, less than %5 of families in the south had slaves.  only the rich had slaves.  and back then the rich were even more influential than now.  it was the rich few that didn't want slavery to end.  why would the average southerner, that had no slaves, even care about slavery?

lovessweetlife
lovessweetlife

I listened to the song and I've read quite a few of the comments here.  I was born and raised in the south but spent my entire adult life on the west coast.  I do understand that people would be proud of where they are from no matter where that might be.  Flying or wearing the Confederate flag is no different than black people claiming African pride by wearing African colors and hanging the African flag or Dominicans or Mexicans or any other person doing the same.  Perhaps to some the Confederate flag is racist and to others the African colors are a symbol of racism.  (Due to the fact that it could be understood that a person wearing those colors does not want to be here) Given the amount of misinformation distributed in our school, I am not surprised that so many people are ignorant to the truth of the Civil War.  Because of this misinformation the flag is associated with only slavery.  I guess what I am trying to say is.  Be proud that you are from the south.  Be proud that you are black.  Be proud that you are from the north.  But let's all of us try to look at this issue from the perspective of the other person both black and white.  Good night.

DocView
DocView

@lovessweetlifeThere is an ignorant assumption that those who are offended must be misinformed. I agree that looking at issues from both perspectives are important--when it is viewed with an open mind. Southern pride isn't a problem-- racism disguised as pride is. Many of our children in the south have received the best education about racism and the flag by listening to their own grandparents who were victims of hate crimes or committed hate crimes under the Confederate flag. Sadly, some have actually witnessed such crimes themselves. I have yet to hear of or read about African Flags (Africa is a continent/not a country), flown over burned churches throughout the south. I know of no African colors or Dominican flags flying over lynched white bodies in the name of pride. Comparing the Confederate flag to ethnic flags is a prejudgement. Is displaying a Nazi Swastika as "pride" offensive to Jews and if so, would you consider them misinformed despite having living family members who survived the Holocaust. 

AmiFaust
AmiFaust

@DocView @lovessweetlife Wow, YOU'RE one to call someone ignorant!  Are you even aware that it was the AFRICANS who captured and sold their fellow Africans to the white men?  I'm sure there was an African flag flying then too!

cherre8073
cherre8073

We can say & feel what we want but really its all about wht the people that went through it feel about it..i wonder wht all of those who died going thru this would feel & have to say about this weather its good r bad im just curious..u cant take back what happened & they wont forget it either so either way there will always b racism somewhere bcause a lot of ppl dnt know how r just dnt want to forgive

DanielGenseric
DanielGenseric

Sad thing is, Brad Paisley will never understand that Anti-racist is a code word for anti-white

LawrenceJDiggs
LawrenceJDiggs like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

It is easy for people to complain about the efforts of others to escape cultural imprisonment and a “race based reality”. I ask the complainers, what have you done TODAY to move us toward a "post race reality"? You can point out obstacles. What did you do to surmount or reduce them? You can complain about the "racism" of others. What did you do about your own? You may have academic debates about how “we are not there”. Irrelevant. What did you do to help get us there? You are part of the solution or you are part of the problem.

As for me, today I down played "race" in a conversation. I challenged the concept of "race" in another. I practiced ignoring peoples exterior as a measure of who they are. I focused on university rather than diversity. I looked for what I have in common with others rather my differences.

It is noteworthy that there is more difference between two people of the same immediate family than between any "races". We can exchange organs with people in other so called "races". We are literally, not figuratively, brothers and sisters. People can’t even say what features their “race has that all of the members of their “race” have and no one in another “race” has. What then is the meaning of “race”?

It is time to ignore the haters who are stuck in a “race based reality”. Those of us who are wanting and willing to move into a “post race reality” need cut these people loose and move on to enjoy life. We don’t need their permission. We don’t need to care what they think. Let’s just leave the light on for them.

SteveDelossantos
SteveDelossantos

PREsident MCkinley  yankee soidier  hate the civil war seen the uglyness of war  .There was   no war in his presidential office . 

SteveDelossantos
SteveDelossantos

Sound like a bunch of mumble jumble country music trying to heal the wounds  no not going to work good intention I  really dont think black people we ever tune in too country muscic ,pride in the south whats so great   of the south ?Southern fry chicken  very good I always think what Abraham did was wrong rapeing killing southern folk to get were he wanted to good .No brainer for the country boy.Yankee town USA.

CherylWernerGlaubinger
CherylWernerGlaubinger like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 3 Like

I was born and raised in the Capitol of the Confederacy -- Richmond, VA.  I'm also white.  When I was five years old, I noticed that a local department store had two water fountains.  When I asked about it, I was told that blacks and whites had to drink separately.  I knew how stupid that was even at age five.  I began to lose trust in the adults who were running things and any "pride" that I may have felt for my Southern roots.  It got worse when, in fourth grade, our textbooks taught that the day slaves were brought to Virginia was "a red letter day for the Commonwealth".  This was not 150 years ago, as the song says, but barely 50 years ago.  I am a fan of both Brad Paisley and LL Cool Jay.  I think their intentions were good and it's important to continue to talk about race relations.  My objection is that, assuming the "red flag" in the song refers to the Stars and Bars Flag of the Confederacy, that is an offensive symbol to anyone who is not racist.  So the offer of forgiveness for the "do-rag vs. the red flag" is a grossly uneven exchange. So is "forgetting about the iron chains in exchange for tolerance of gold chains". 

goldenarmz976
goldenarmz976 like.author.displayName 1 Like

@CherylWernerGlaubinger i find the intentions of the song to be misguided.  however you look at it, it puts people in boxes.  I'm as  they come and I have never worn a "doo rag" or a "gold chain" just like no white person that I know has never flown the stars and bars.  Most people don't do either of those things and it cheapens the conversation, to have two men who don't have any right to speak on behalf of their races, elucidate this very complex issue in a dumb song.  Shame on both of them.  I liked your comment, though, Cheryl

ShalandaGlaspie
ShalandaGlaspie

I live in Jackson Mississippi and things do still occur here, I do think racism should be addressed. Some people still raise their kids to tolerate one another, because they have to be around each other... I think the song is a GREAT song and I don't understand why people got a problem with it, unless they are the ones that are racist...

TimYoho
TimYoho

What I find funny about the reaction of Brad making comment about being from the South is that he IS NOT.  He was born and raised in Glendale WV which is above the Mason Dixon Line.  Contrary to what many people seem to know, WV broke away from the South and most fought for the North.  Although he may be promoting a Southern background for his music and living in Tennessee, he was born and raised a Yankee.

kittenlyric
kittenlyric

I love all the talk about the Confederate flag and comparing it to the Nazi flag. Actually Nazis looked more to out treatment of native Americans than our treatment of blacks. How many of these same people support Washington Redskins or Atlanta Braves, use Land O Lakes butter, drive Jeep Cherokees or talk about "the low man on the totem pole' or "Indian giver"? No when you talk native rights we are being too sensitive or too politically correct. Change the names of these teams, put OUR native people in the present and not kept in the past, then we can talk about the confederate flag. You can't pick and choose which race to stand up for. Either you support racism or you don't. 

DocView
DocView

@kittenlyric Love your post and I have always found those offensive. You do know that racists do not pick and choose, they are just racist..period. But they tend to speak louder about the racial history they feel most comfortable with or believe they know more about. 

vsd
vsd like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 3 Like

I was born and raised in Southern Georgia, I am black, and I have only on one occasion in my life been offended by the Confederate Flag. The Confederate Flag is not offensive to me when it is flown beneath the American Flag where it belongs. The one time I was offended by the Confederate Flag, I was on my way to an appointment and had to meet one of my co-workers. He was giving me directions to his location and he said when you make the right by the confederate flag, the house is on the right. When I arrived at the destination, there were about 100 confederate flags covering a yard, trees, bushes and the trailer in the yard. The confederate flag in that instance was offense because that is what the person that lived in the residence intended.

LstandsforL
LstandsforL like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

@vsd I'm white, a "northerner" and the Confederate flag offends me DEEPLY. It's a symbol of a culture that profited from slavery. How can you dismiss that 12 million Africans were torn from their homes and sold into slavery during that era? They weren't even treated like human beings, but rather animals. That's what that hideous flag represents - preserving that way of life. My northern ancestors fought and died for YOUR FREEDOM, and to preserve the Union of the United States of America. Anybody who flies that flag IMO, is anti-American.

vsd
vsd like.author.displayName 1 Like

@LstandsforL @vsd I don't dismiss anything about the number of Africans that were sold into slavery, that portion of my history is a part of my past and definetly playes a part in who I am, and just so we are clear your northern ancestors were fighting a war in order to continue to control the south! Lets not get it twisted, the civil war was not about slavery, that was a ploy in Lincoln's plan to cripple the south! That is what your ancestors were fighting for not to free the slaves!

DocView
DocView

@vsd Like yourself, African Americans don't and can't dismiss the numbers that were sold into slavery and it is a part of their past and plays a part in who they are for generations. Ploy or not, the result was the end of slavery and our Confederate ancestors tried to preserve it.  

goldenarmz976
goldenarmz976

@LstandsforL @vsd the entire country profited from slavery.  the textile industry in the north, was a direct benifciery of the cotton from Dixie...jussayin

AmiFaust
AmiFaust

@DocView @goldenarmz976 @LstandsforL @vsd Um, actually yes, the whole country did profit from slavery.  The Emancipation Proclamation (the beginning to the end of slavery) was only enacted two years into the Civil War by Lincoln as a ploy to beat the South.  The Emancipation Proclamation only freed slaves in the states that were still holding out.  The states that were on the side of the North got to keep their slaves.  It wasn't until two years later that the 13th Amendment was signed, which freed ALL slaves.

Operative
Operative

@vsd  Hilarious, so many white folks in denial, so much so they feel the need to imitate black folks on this message board.. LOL

AmiFaust
AmiFaust

@Operative @vsd You know what's funnier?  You not having an intelligent argument so instead you put up useless comments in order to get your name on a website to make you feel special.


Lathia
Lathia like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 4 Like

I am  a Southern born and breed African American female,, 58 yrs of age.  When I was growing up we share cropped, or should I say worked in fields that weren't ours, fields that belonged to white farm owners (very close to a plantation).  My parents were uneducated because they had to work in fields to help support their families also when they were growing up.  We are not talking that long ago, the 1940s, 50s even 60s.  It wasn't because we were lazy or ignorant. For so many decades after the Civil War we were still oppressed by White America not the white south or the white north but White America.  Our schools were not as well equipped, we still had separate entries into buildings, separate sitting area, for a long time in the south after the Civil War there were 'Jim Crow' laws for Blacks.  If you don't know what they are look them up.  You have to look pass the Civil War to see why the Confederate flag is so upsetting to  some Blacks.  Were things so perfect in the North?  Of course not.  But in the North you had rights and you could find people White and Black that would stand up for those rights....not so much in the South.  That being said and a host of other things I could say...the Confederate Flag does not scare me.  I believe you have a right to your Confederate Flag, to your memories, to honor your ancestors whether they were Confederate or Union. I will hold on to the things that are dear and precious to me and everyone else should do the same.  Can we take race out of it?  I don't know but we should try.  If you have a rebel flag on your truck and you treat me with respect that is all that matters.  If you wear your sagging pants but you respect me that is what matters to me. Congrats to Brad and LL for starting a conversation. With any luck it will get bigger.  And if we respect each other it may get heated but we can keep it civil.

crume78
crume78 like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

@Lathia 

Amen! I am a white southerner who also grew up poor in the South. Born and raised in Memphis,TN. From what I experienced living in a rough neighberhood, going to a school with 70% black was: There is racism on both sides, I saw it from whites as well as blacks. There seemed to be more prejudice against the poor than a race. I have been harrassed by white cops and black cops, even stripped search down to my boxers on a corner for walking down the street. I had my car ripped apart many times by black and white cops for being in the "wrong" neighborhood. I saw white gangs attack blacks and black gangs attack whites. Ignorance seems to be the common problem. Ignorant of the past, ignorant of other cultures, and ignorance of education. I teach my kids like my mom taught me, Love everyone and Respect everyone, regardless of color or beliefs. As Christians, we are not to hate anyone, especially because of something as stupid as skin color, or culture difference. One of my favorite people is Martin Luther King. He was a great Christian and a Great Man for preaching a non violent uprising and to not accept the staus quo but to better ourselves and to fight for what was right. While I grew up in the city, at lot of my family were also share croppers from rural areas. They did what they had to do to make it and I respect them for that as I respect your family. I pray that some day, we can have converstions whithout injecting race.

luxo1917
luxo1917

to brad paisley the conferate flag is equal to the nazi flag used by the germans to kill 6 million jews in ww2 , the conferate flag should be banned, in germany the nazi symbol is banned. just like tom petty, who wears a confederate flag on a cowboy hat , and who also wrote a song (like a rebel) brad paisley and tom petty join the ranks of  racists who happen to be stars. as for jj kool j  what would gill scott heron think of your sorry ass. and as for the main stream media, its ok to round up people (men, women and children) and throw them into a lime pit.  

JoeyWooten
JoeyWooten

@luxo1917 wrong wrong wrong your comment is absolutly wrong and ignorant to compare the confederate flag to the nazi flag do know anything about history slave owners were not trying to commit genocide and secondly the confederate flag represents the 13 original collonies you idiot and thats goes for anyone else thats too lazy to read a history book

DocView
DocView

@JoeyWooten @luxo1917 Joey you are right! Slave owners didn't commit genocide towards their own property. They chose to kill millions of Africans and their decedents (and suppressed many more) over three centuries, unlike the nazi's killing millions over decades. Both flags are offensive. Reread your 6th grade textbook and find the chapters on the original colonies and the Civil War. Check the dates and try to figure out why was the Confederate flag flown over lynched bodies well after and our nation's independence and after the Civil War. Look for connections between flying the flag over burned churches in the 21st Century and the 13 original colonies. The flag was not originally intended as a symbol of racism but unfortunately it has been used in racist activities, politics and hate crimes since Reconstruction. This is only part of the several reasons why it's offensive to many of our fellow Americans and our military who honor our nation's flag.   

crume78
crume78

@luxo1917

You my friend are very uneducated. So it was ok they owned slaves in the North and you have no problem with them flying their flag? Really? How about your favorite person that wanted to free slaves or did he, Lincoln?

"My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery, and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union. I shall do less whenever I shall believe what I am doing hurts the cause, and I shall do more whenever I shall believe doing more will help the cause"

Get educated then make relevant comments not hatred from ignorance.
.



cami0777
cami0777 like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

I love Brad Paisley, and I think he did a great job trying to OPEN the conversation about the issue of racism in the south. As someone born and raised in the south, there is very little conversation about the issue of racism in the south. If you're not from the south, then you really cannot understand the depth and magnitude of this issue. Furthermore, if you're not from the south, you cannot understand how white southerners view the civil war/the confederate flag. I applaud Brad Paisley for trying to begin a conversation. It's more than most celebrities have done on this issue.

jssk
jssk like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 3 Like

It's a forgettable song by its own merits, hard to imagine it could cause much attention if not for the so-called controversy. Though I don't find anything controversial or offensive in the lyrics. In fact both guys try to strike a conciliatory tone about the judgmental habits of our society. However, the title "accidental racist" gives the whole thing a bad smell. Accidental? Just because you were raised that way doesn't mean you are no longer responsible for your actions. An "accident" is never enough to explain away the miseries inflicted on the discriminated.

Hollamann
Hollamann like.author.displayName 1 Like

The thing about the Confederate Flag, the stars and bars, whatever you want to call it, is that it is racist.

Why is it racist?

Because the people who suffered and continue to suffer through racism said it is.

If you're a white man or woman, YOU don't get to decide what is and isn't racist.

And save me the "Well, they always play the race card!!1!!1!" rhetoric.

Certainly the 'race card' gets played far too often in this PC day and age.  This, however, is not one of those cases.  Whatever that flag meant to those who fought and died during the Civil War and to those who wanted to remember those who died, it doesn't mean that anymore.  Now all it represents is a time in American history where black men and women were sold like livestock and forced into labor because white men thought that was an okay thing to do.  Whether that is or isn't what you think it should represent is a moot point.  It does.  End of story.

crume78
crume78

@Hollamann 

So you are saying, ONLY WHITES can be RACIST? Why did I even type all the messages below debating with an uneducated idiot? 

Operative
Operative like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

Racism presupposes the ability to control a significant segment of the population through imposed policies coercively, black people may be bigots, they may be prejudiced, but not racist.

In order to be racist, white men would have to be hung for just being white men or for looking at black women the wrong way. So there is no parallel between white racism and black racism

DocView
DocView

@windasman No sir. This still happens, church burnings and all. This is how racism continues when some of us are not aware (or even care) about what happens outside of their own small box yet make prejudgements. Please simply google racial hate crimes and add any southern state or better yet, ask a southern black person if it still happens. I do believe that both races have racists and bigots. However, there is a long and current history of violent and generational racism, bigotry and disenfranchisement against blacks. This does not excuse racism from blacks towards whites but it may explain why there is mistrust and fear. 

windasman
windasman

So in order to be racist, black men would have to be hung for just being black men or looking at white women the wrong way? You're talking about decades ago, sir. We're talking about today.

crume78
crume78

@Hollamann 

Also, if you were to visit the South, say Mississipi, you would even see blacks waving the flag, are they racist against themselves? 

luxo1917
luxo1917

hi everybody crume78 is starring in the remake of the dukes of hazzard in which crume78 is boss hog,tome petty is bo duke , brad paisley is luke duke and ll kool j plays uncle tom. the south lost the civil war, get over it.

windasman
windasman like.author.displayName 1 Like

@Hollamann You would think that the Civil War was all about slavery listening to you & most history books. It was about states' rights and the culture of industry vs agriculture. The Confederate flag is not a racist symbol by any means, and it is wrong of you to put that stereotype upon it.

uchusky99
uchusky99 like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

@windasman @Hollamann 

Even if it is not a symbol of racism, it is a symbol of treason. Even if we are going to pretend that the war was not about slavery-it was about people attacking a US military base rather than utilizing the representatives they had in the house and senate-and accepting that sometimes in a democracy you do not get more votes than the other side-which does not mean that you leave or use violence.

I am not saying that people today should be ashamed in the south-as they were not even born yet. But, to pick the actions of traitors who almost ended this country as something to fly a flag in honor of?

DocView
DocView

@windasman Very good comparison. However, we do not prominently display the British flag at  some of our state capitals, colleges and local government buildings right next to our nation's flag. 

windasman
windasman like.author.displayName 1 Like

I'm sure that many in the south at the time viewed it as the same thing as rising up against the Brits: treasonous, depending on your viewpoint. Why didn't the original colonists use their resources to lobby the king for what they wanted, rather than take up arms against him? Because they felt it was their last & only remaining option.

Operative
Operative like.author.displayName 1 Like

@windasman @Hollamann

Shame you folks who pride yourself on that "southern pride" are completely ignorant regarding the history of the very thing you put so much "pride" in.. 


Stephan Hale who was a resident of Alabama, and signed the Confederate States Constitution and was later commissioned as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Confederate States Army. Would beg to differ from you

At the time that he made the follow statement below, in December of 1860, he was one of several commissioners from Alabama sent to other slave states to advocate for their secession

quote:


“African slavery has not only become one of the fixed domestic institutions of the Southern states, but forms an important element of their political power, and constitutes the most valuable species of their property…forming, in fact, the basis upon which rests the prosperity and wealth of most of these states…It is upon this gigantic interest, this peculiar institution of the South, that the Northern states and their people have been waging an unrelenting and fanatical war for the last quarter of a century. An institution with which is bound up, not only the wealth and prosperity of the Southern people, but their very existence as a political community…They attack us through their literature, in their schools, from the hustings, in their legislative halls, through the public press…to strike down the rights of the Southern slave-holder, and override every barrier which the Constitution has erected for his protection.”

DocView
DocView

@windasman Our flag has changed since slavery was generally accepted throughout our young country and that older version is not used in hate crimes or used to intimidate others. Our previous national flags were not intentionally displayed during civil rights legislations for the explicit purpose to offend and intimidate. Recent historical accounts are not only found in the Yankee narrative, but are recalled by living congressmen and grandparents. I believe that most white southerners are not racist but still respect their history and are proud of their families' sacrifices in the Confederacy.  Most also understand and respect that there is racial discomfort associated with the flag and therefore do not prominently display it. Just because you may not be racist or use the Confederate flag doesn't mean that others have not witnessed it's negative use or can easily dismmiss the images and impact it had on their families. It doesn't take a Yankee narrative to have empathy or to respect what others may find offensive. 

windasman
windasman

I agree that many who participated in the South's secession were in favor of slavery. Horrible viewpoint, IMHO. HOWEVER that does not mean everyone was a racist. Hell, America as a whole embraced slavery from its beginning, yet you don't consider the American flag a racist symbol? I have never lived in the south personally, and do not use a Confederate flag for ANYTHING. However, that doesn't mean that I automatically believe the Yankee narrative that the Civil War was ONLY about slavery.

maxdout10
maxdout10 like.author.displayName 1 Like

the thing about this country is you don't get to decide what is rascist either.  if i want to take the confederate flag and wave it in your face, i can.

Operative
Operative like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

@maxdout10 Listen here son, I got a notion you weren't burdened with an over abundance of schoolin while you was growin up, so let me make this abundantly clear.  

Your attitude isn't helping anyone and your persistance in holding on to these racist symbols of the past under the guise of "pride" have grown quite old and are stinking up the U.S.A with an odor all manner of foul and putrid. 

Fortunately for you there is a solution to this malodorous mindset that you and your ilk cling to tightly to, its called getting an education son, read some books. turn off the TV. 

The world is a changing son, either keep up and evolve or be left behind clinging to your guns and circling  your wagons.