British Dairy Farmer Creates Pure Milk Vodka

Is milk really a bad choice? One wonders if news anchorman Ron Burgundy would still feel the same way if he chugged down pure milk vodka instead of a carton of milk. Of course he would have to give up his favorite scotch.

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Pascal Rossignol / Reuters

Holstein cows graze in a pasture near the Capron family farm in Rebreuve sur Canche, northern France, July 29, 2009.

While U.K. retailers are rationing baby milk powder and breast milk is being turned into jewelry, it seems that milk in all forms is proving to be a hot commodity.  And now one British dairy farmer is using the white stuff to make vodka.

Jason Barber has created the world’s first pure milk vodka from a herd of 250 grass-grazed cows at his farm in West Dorset, England, according to the Daily Mail.

The dairy farmer makes his vodka, Black Cow, by separating the milk into curds and whey.  The curds are used to make cheese, and the whey is fermented into a beer.  That milk beer is then distilled and treated with Barber’s secret blending process to make a distilled spirit, which is then triple filtered before being bottled.

(MORE: U.K. Retailers Begin Rationing Baby Formula in Response to Chinese Demand)

Barber’s special vodka blend took him three years to create, the New York Daily News noted.  His inspiration came from wanting to diversify the produce from his dairy herd and his personal interest in vodka, according to the Black Cow website.

It looks like others are also interested in a new kind of vodka.  Black Cow has been reviewed in recent issues of British Vogue, Monocle and Wallpaper*.  The smooth vodka with a unique creamy character has gained celebrity fans like Daniel Craig, Elizabeth Hurley and chef Heston Blumenthal, according to the Daily Mail.

Although wine and cheese are often paired together, maybe pure milk vodka will go nicely with some cheddar, as the milk Barber uses for Black Cow is actually the same one he uses to make his 1833 cheddar — which won an award at the 2012 World Cheese Awards.

MORE: Breast-Milk Jewelry: The Must-Have Mommy Memento

9 comments
Mic750
Mic750

Not quite sure if vodka and milk work for me. Even if it tastes good, I still wouldn't buy it though. I write a blog http://korsvodka.com and I tasted over 100 different vodka brands. In case I get the chance I'll test this one as well and let you know. Thanks! 

AdamRussell
AdamRussell

Kinda makes me think of the milk bar in A Clockwork Orange that served hallucinogenic drinks.

PhilSmith
PhilSmith like.author.displayName 1 Like

I bet he milks this product for all that it is worth.

JamesR.Hunt
JamesR.Hunt

It is said that part of the workers (no not talking slave class) of Egypt during off planting season. A regular drink is speculated to have been served that was a heavy protein vitamin that was alcoholic. It kept the works fit and well nourished after long day. They where also well fed as evidence of massive caffeteria style works near the pyramids themselves. The additional bonus supposedly was that the workers where kept from causing too much trouble and get a good nights sleep. 


WasteTimeAndGet
WasteTimeAndGet

I believe there are many nomadic herding cultures who ferment milk, including milk of cows, horses, camels, yaks, and other animals, and they've been doing it since time immemorial.  But they don't distill it.

vtpropdad
vtpropdad

In Vermont USA The fine folks at Vermont Spirits have been making a Vodka purely from milk sugar since 1998. 

alexwlee
alexwlee

my god. a genius has been born. he should patent this and make money off of the idea.

mkelly9772
mkelly9772

@alexwlee You can't patent a recipe. You can only make it a trade secret, which really only prevents employees from disclosing the recipe. But if someone else finds their own way to distill fermented milk then they've basically discovered it on their own.