Breast Milk-Flavored Lollipops Are Real

"These lollipops won't bring back childhood memory; they'll bring up animal instinct."

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Lollyphile

Following in the growing trend of breast milk cheese, breast milk jewelry and breast milk ice cream, here comes another treat: Breast milk-flavored lollipops. But these suckers won’t be shut down by the health officials, like the creators of the now-infamous “Baby Gaga” breast milk ice cream, because the lollipop made by the Austin, Texas company Lollyphile, is not actually made from breast milk, it just tastes like it is. In fact, the confection is vegan.

When Lollyphile founder Jason Darling’s friends started having babies, Darling made an unofficial survey of the tots’ behavior. One thing he noticed was that breast milk calmed those kids right down. “Sure, the kids are all crazy cute,” said Darling in a statement on the Lollyphile website, “But what slowly dawned on me was that my friends were actually producing milk so delicious it could turn a screaming, furious child into a docile, contented one. I knew I had to capture that flavor.”

(MORE: That Was Fast: Health Officials Stop Sales of Breast-Milk Ice Cream)

With the help of some breastfeeding mothers, who “kept sharing their breast milk with our flavor specialists until we were able to candify it,” Darling was able to achieve his dream of crafting a lollipop sure to appeal to, well, breastfed babies at least. Darling, told the Los Angeles Times that to perfect the breast milk flavor of the lollipop, he tried the milk from four open-minded new mothers. “One of my friends had a preemie — it was seven months — and she had higher levels of colostrum, which made it sweeter, blue and thicker,” Darling told the LA Times. “It all kind of tastes sort of like almond milk, but sweeter.” The resulting sucker, which joins the company’s other unusual offerings (Sriracha-flavored lollipop, anyone?), is made from sugar, corn syrup and natural flavors.

So what do the lollipops taste like? According to the Lollyphile website, they are “quite possibly the most inherently satisfying flavor of all time.” Darling also noted on his website that, “These lollipops won’t bring back childhood memory; they’ll bring up animal instinct.”

A pack of four lollipops will cost you $10, a dozen for $24 and a case of 36 for $58, but to get free shipping, you can use the code MAMMALS, of course.

MORE: Breast-Milk Jewelry: The Must-Have Mommy Memento

MORE: The Trend Continues: Breast-Milk Cheese on Display in New York

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