Lululemon’s Fake CEO Ad Gets 160 Real Applicants

The $1.37 billion company desperately needs a new CEO, but the ad itself was just a joke.

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Lululemon Athletica / Facebook

Judging by the recent ad seeking her successor, Lululemon CEO Christine Day had a tough job even before the infamous see-through yoga pants incident in March. According to the listing, which was posted to the company’s website on Friday, the next CEO of the $1.37 billion apparel chain must be able to hold a headstand for at least 10 minutes, have both Bill Clinton and Oprah Winfrey on speed dial, be fluent in Sanskrit, and look good in the Mansy—Lululemon’s high-riding leotard.

Just kidding! Perhaps in an effort to make light of the company’s recent spate of bad news — including the $67 million recall of the Luon pants and the June 10 announcement of Day’s resignation — the company posted the fake ad, which it also promoted on Facebook. Over 160 people had applied for the job before the company removed the post on Monday, according to CNN Money.

The job description goes on to make several yoga-based inside jokes:

-Your go-to party trick is your dead-on impression of the yogi in “Sh*T Yogis Say”
-You voted for Pedro
-You actively live and breathe the lululemon culture – on Friday afternoons you hit up wheatgrass and tequila shots (it’s called work/life balance)
-You use your third eye to channel innovation
-Your lineage is directly related to Phidippides

Despite the absurd requirements, candidates may have been intrigued by the job’s biggest perk: “You report to no one, you are the CEO (duh)” — which, come to think of it, is also a joke since CEOs of publicly-held companies are always beholden to shareholders, not to mention their board of directors.

(MORE: No, the Lululemon CEO Didn’t Get Fired for See-Through Yoga Pants)

According to a Lululemon spokesperson, the company pulled the “CEO Wanted” prank to demonstrate that it has “always been a fun and irreverent brand.” Whether the PR stunt will boost the brand’s sales has yet to be seen. Shares of Lululemon are down nearly 19% since Day announced that she was resigning on June 10.

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1 comments
TheForumCorp
TheForumCorp

A change in executive leadership at a corporation is typically a fragile period, often cloaked in secrecy. Lululemon's use of social media was creative and succeeded in fostering transparency and dulling the negative publicity around their leadership crisis. The Forum Corp. recently discussed this topic in a post on our blog http://www.forum.com/blog/making-lemonade-out-of-a-leadership-lemon/ We'd love to get your thoughts.