Dunkin’ Donuts Will Sell Gluten-Free Baked Goods

The gluten intolerant can now be gluttonous

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Courtesy of Dunkin' Donuts
Courtesy of Dunkin' Donuts

Dunkin’ Donuts plans to offer gluten-free cinnamon-sugar doughnuts and blueberry muffins across its U.S. stores by the end of the year, Stan Frankenthaler, the company’s executive chef, told Bloomberg News. To avoid contamination from the shops’ other baked goods that contain wheat flour, the gluten-free items will be packaged individually.

The waist-stretching treats already went through a trial run at two locations in Miami, Florida and a few locations in Canton, Massachusetts–where chain’s corporate headquarters are located.

(MOREWhy We’re Wasting Billions on Gluten-Free Food)

While only 1 in 133 Americans suffer from celiac disease–the condition that induces extreme digestive discomfort after consuming gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley– 29% of Americans say they are trying to avoid gluten, lending some to believe that “gluten-free” may be perceived as a healthier alternative.

Gluten-free doesn’t mean calorie-free, however: The wheat-less doughnut has 320 calories versus a regular glazed doughnut with 260 calories. Dunkin’s gluten-free blueberry muffin has 400 calories, compared to 460 for the standard version and 410 for a reduced-fat one.

(MOREAll Hype? Gluten-Free Diets May Not Help Many)

Besides hitting your waistline, this speciality foods can also hit your wallet. Gluten-free foods are typically twice as expensive as regular ones because kitchen scientists have to find a replacement for gluten that will give the finished product the same light, chewy texture. The gluten-free Cinnamon Sugar Donut is slated to cost $1.89, versus a regular doughnut at $1.06 a pop. The gluten-free Blueberry Muffin is $2.39, as opposed to $1.81 for a regular muffin. (Regular prices are reflective of the prices at the Miami store that had been offering the gluten-free options.)

MORE: What’s Your Wheat Problem?

11 comments
LauraSturgisBoule
LauraSturgisBoule

I do have Celiac and sometimes you are in an airport or traveling on a long road trip and it is just nice to be able to grab something quick just like everyone else.  While it might not be healthy if you only have it occasionally then no bid deal.  This gives the people that do have Celiac a food option when they go to Dunkin Donuts.  This was something we never had before.  The disappointing part is I have stopped by 4 different Dunkin Donut locations recently in the Boston area and none of them are carrying these products to date.  

RealAppeal
RealAppeal

I am gluten free manufacturer that was diagnosed when I was 10 years old.  If I eat ANY gluten containing items, I get sick.  It can go from mild bloating to the extreme.  I have always told my students that it is important to get ALL of the facts before coming to a decision.  We offer doughnuts also and they retial at $1.50.  It is important to use good ingredients and leave out the additives and fillers no matter gluten free or not. 

LaurenWasinger
LaurenWasinger

While only 1 in 133 Americans has Celiac, an estimated 30% of us has some form of gluten sensitivity. Think of it as a cousin of Celiac. Where Celiac is an autoimmune condition, in which the body attacks itself when triggered by gluten, gluten sensitivity is a more typical allergy occurring in various degrees. For some people, it's quite extreme, causing internal bleeding and malnutrition. For others, it causes minor bloating and discomfort. In all cases, it's quite real and should not be treated as some fad diet by crummy journalists who can't be bothered with research.

jmaudlin
jmaudlin

Horrible! Your misinformation is appalling! Obviously, gluten free "junk" Is just as bad for you as regular "junk" so  most of the time I avoid processed foods altogether but it's nice to have a treat now and then like "normal" people. I do not have Celiac disease but I'm SEVERELY gluten intolerant, meaning that wheat/ gluten gives me painful mouth sores, stomach cramps, bloating, gas, and caused me to develop a debilitating B12 deficiency before I figured out what was making me sick more than six years ago. A few months ago I also got diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder, and there are ACTUAL SCIENTIFIC studies that show links between gluten sensitivity and autoimmune diseases. So stop contributing to the misconception that going gluten-free is some kind of fleeting diet trend. The world needs to stop criticizing our dietary limitations and start asking what genetically modified food is doing to our bodies!

david.birney
david.birney

I do not have Celiac, however I went Gluten Free for my wife, and suddenly I do get cramps and bloating and gas after I eat.   I obviously have some type of issue with wheat and it seems like it is more whole wheat that gives me issues.  Over the past year I have learned going Gluten Free really means giving up on Processed foods in general.  When I end up eating lots of the processed crap Gluten or not I start having digestion problems. So I will be avoiding these sweet treats for sure, especially since they are not made fresh. 

BitteninBergen
BitteninBergen

Agreed - what a lousy research job on this article and shame on the author for all the unnecessary hype.

Going gluten free was not something that my family has taken to very easily - but we have done it because we are fighting chronic infections.  Our medical doctor informed us that during this time, our bodies are in a state of inflammation.  Gluten is one of the most common inflammation-provoking foods there are and it is in so many of the foods we eat.  

By eliminating gluten from our diets, we helping to reduce the degree to which our immune system has to work to fight the infections.  Our doctor has assured us that once we are better that we can go back to gluten - but for now, we are careful with our diets.

Gluten free diets are also recommended within the autism community for similar reasons.  More information at autism (dot) com.

And kudos to Dunkin Donuts for making the effort.  Hopefully they will expand to other flavors, like chocolate donuts.  In the meantime, we'll just keep enjoying our Kinnikinnick GF chocolate donuts.  

SharonChrystaMashburn
SharonChrystaMashburn

Some people have an allergy to Gluten without having Celiac Disease.  Any Gluten based products cause me to itch and I get mouth sores.  There have been studies that have linked Gluten to other auto-immune diseases as well.  Do your research first, don't just spit out nonsense.  Much like I tell my children, "Don't talk just to hear yourself speak.  Make sure what you have to say is accurate and worth listening to."

rogersvivian
rogersvivian

I am shocked by the lack of accurate information you provide about Celiac Disease. According to Wikipedia "Coeliac disease (/ˈsiːli.æk/; spelled celiac disease in North America[1] and often celiac sprue) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine that occurs in genetically predisposed people of all ages from middle infancy onward. Symptoms include pain and discomfort in the digestive tract, chronic constipation and diarrhoea, failure to thrive (in children), and fatigue, but these may be absent, and symptoms in other organ systems have been described. Vitamin deficiencies are often noted in people with coeliac disease owing to the reduced ability of the small intestine to properly absorb nutrients from food."

As a person recently diagnosed with Celiac, I did not choose this nor do I want this. Gluten free is not a choice, it is not a fad, it is my life now. However, the key point about Celiac Disease is not the discomfort that is the big problem, it is an autoimmune disease that genetic and it damages the intestines. I can't cheat not even one day. My father has it, I have it, and my daughter has it. We all carry the gene and all test positive for the disease.

rogersvivian
rogersvivian

I am shocked by the lack of accurate information you provide about Celiac Disease. According to Wikipedia "Coeliac disease (/ˈsiːli.æk/; spelled celiac disease in North America[1] and often celiac sprue) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine that occurs in genetically predisposed people of all ages from middle infancy onward. Symptoms include pain and discomfort in the digestive tract, chronic constipation and diarrhoea, failure to thrive (in children), and fatigue, but these may be absent, and symptoms in other organ systems have been described. Vitamin deficiencies are often noted in people with coeliac disease owing to the reduced ability of the small intestine to properly absorb nutrients from food."

As a person recently diagnosed with Celiac, I did not choose this nor do I want this. Gluten free is not a choice, it is my life now. However, the key point about Celiac Disease is not the discomfort that is the big problem, it is an autoimmune disease that genetic and it damages the intestines. I can't cheat not even one day.

JohnJ.Giardina
JohnJ.Giardina

This is journalism? Time ought to be ashamed. This is a biased opinion piece made out to be news. Enabling people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance to have an occassional donut with their family does not make them gluttonous. Why can't Time simply report the news without giving us the "journalist's" opinion? It's offensive.

a.navin.johnson
a.navin.johnson

I see gluten-free as hype. The name "gluten" makes it sound yukky. Most people have no issues with gluten. I understand there are people that have a sensitivity to it and those people should definitely avoid it. It's nice Dunkin' is giving them an alternative. Whole grains are very healthy for the majority of people and it would be shame to avoid whole grains, where many contain gluten, when there is really no need to.