WATCH: Spinning Statue at Manchester Museum Mystifies Staff

Time-lapsed footage shows an ancient Egyptian statue imperceptibly rotating in its display case

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Several months ago, Campbell Price, a curator of Egyptian art at the Manchester Museum in Great Britain, noticed that a statue from the Middle Kingdom had rotated in its glass case 180 degrees, so that its backside was facing the public. He suspected a prank. “Most Egyptologists are not superstitious people,” he wrote on the museum’s blog. When the museum trained a camera on the statue, the time-lapsed footage didn’t capture pranksters on tape — instead it showed the statue rotating imperceptibly on its own throughout the day and night.

The 10-inch tall stone carving dates back to 1,800 B.C. and bears an inscription on the back calling on the Egyptian god Osiris to accept it as an offering from the dead.

(MORE: ‘Frankenstein’ Mummies Found in Scotland)

Price has denied accusations of engineering a publicity stunt. “I promise that I haven’t been spinning the statuette,” he wrote to a skeptic on Twitter. Nonetheless, the museum has struggled to explain the statue’s rotations. One theory holds that vibrations from patrons’ footsteps or nearby traffic jiggled the statue out of place. But that doesn’t explain why neighboring artifacts haven’t budged an inch or why the statue suddenly started to move after standing for years in perfect stillness, as statues tend to do.

According to BBC News, a prominent television physicist in England has weighed in with the theory that “differential friction” between the statue’s stone and the glass shelf has created a gentle vibration that shifted the statue out of place. But the freakiest clue comes from Price, who told the Telegraph that the statue was placed in a tomb where it could serve as a vessel for the departed’s spirit. He added, “Maybe that is what is causing the movement?”

(MORE: The Break-in at Cairo’s Prized Museum)

14 comments
cranberryjames
cranberryjames

It could be operating on a system similar to the Crookes Radiometer as that is powered by the sun and the statue was only moving during the daytime. But, who knows. Someone online said it is made of magnet but that doesn't explain why it's not rotating at night. I wouldn't be surprised at all if it were just a prank. But, the Egyptians were highly intelligent, I don't want to discredit them. 

SergioGumercindo
SergioGumercindo

Just like a Fake

If miracles exist. Think about. What is Miracles. Something that can't explaint it.

In my point of view, that fake, because it's ease to produce this kind of "miracle" or "special effects".

This is the "special effects" of time lapsed or "Stop Motion".

Note that the statue moves only in the time when the museum is open to the public.

There's someone moving it discreetly, time after time. And it was not noticed.

Don't  believe in the display (on the top of video) - That Simple: You can add any number, any time, any information in video,  later, by edition. But, If you can acess on the monitoring room. Bingo!


MarkTsmx
MarkTsmx

@SergioGumercindo You have a good point. It made me think of the amount of added tourism that the place will not get from this event.

omaoildeirg
omaoildeirg

Just like everything else that happens on this Earth of ours ---- Absolutely nothing happens without a reason. There is a natural explanation for everything from the beginning of time. God is the only real mystery in this life/world of ours.

MarkTsmx
MarkTsmx

@omaoildeirgActually God is NOT a mystery. It's our willingness to listen to his, or ITS, doctrines to live better that is a mystery until we do those things as designated.

JoeArnold
JoeArnold

I t seems to me that this is exactly the kind of mysticism our culture needs. If we are to survive the next millennium, we need ritual to return so we can experience true rites of passage for the preservation of our species (and I am not talking about organized religions which have failed miserably). Spirituality can be and must be a huge part of our lives for it is the logical thought process that has lead us to our current debacle....I will be releasing my book about spirituality in the coming year which sheds some light on how we as a society must reconnect with ourselves to help us through the next keyhole...."The Song" by Cuseami....

astarkar
astarkar

The milliseconds rarely change from ":23" and if they do it is to ":25" - timestamp editing!

MarkTsmx
MarkTsmx

This is not mystery. If they put the statue on a piece of felt then it would not move. The stone and the glass are slippery enough to allow the statue to rotate due to the vibration of the people and the traffic.

MaseWehrle
MaseWehrle

@MarkTsmx What abt the other statues-they do not move. Also, this thing hasn't moved in yrs but now all of a sudden vibrations from people walking are going to effect it?

MarkTsmx
MarkTsmx

@MaseWehrle I see your point. Still from the video you can see that the statue moves more during the high volume of traffic in the museum and outside of the museum.

Definitely looks like the vibrations are the cause.

suspicious123
suspicious123

"... instead it showed the statue rotating imperceptibly on its own throughout the day and night." Um, I only saw it moving during daylight hours, not at night. And just because this is a time-lapse video, doesn't mean that it couldn't be edited by professional editors. 


MaseWehrle
MaseWehrle like.author.displayName 1 Like

@suspicious123 You'll never be convinced it is something else then-even if you saw the unedited version your self.

suspicious123
suspicious123 like.author.displayName 1 Like

@MaseWehrle Maybe it's not fake, but there has to be a logical explanation other than "spirits", "ghosts", or whatever. 

Lorkham
Lorkham

@suspicious123

Try to avoid narrow-mindedness. I'm not superstitious, myself, but those are no grounds on which to dismiss a theory against which there is little evidence.