Unveiling America’s First Public Monument to Atheism

Surprisingly, some of its most vocal critics are other atheists

  • Share
  • Read Later
American Atheists

Following a lawsuit and more than a year of controversy, at noon on Saturday a group called the American Atheists will unveil the United States’ first public monument to atheism in a square outside the Bradford County courthouse in Starke, Florida, near Jacksonville. The five-foot-long, grey granite bench and connecting pillar, which were built and engraved by local masons using granite quarried in Georgia, will feature secular quotes from the Founding Fathers as well as a statement from the organization’s founder, Madalyn Murray O’Hair, encapsulating the 50-year-old group’s views:

“An atheist believes that a hospital should be built instead of a church. An atheist believes that deed must be done instead of prayer. An atheist strives for involvement in life and not escape into death. He wants disease conquered, poverty banished, war eliminated.”

As a rule, atheists aren’t big on monuments, due to their religious symbolism. But the 4000-member group decided to erect one anyway after it lost a lawsuit in March that would have forced a local Christian group to remove its own monument – two stone tablets engraved with the Ten Commandments – located in the same public square. Once the atheist bench and attached pillar are in place, the two monuments will stand just a few yards apart in the square’s “Free Speech Zone,” where private citizens are allowed to erect displays.

“We don’t want to establish this monument, we feel we need to establish it,” says American Atheists President David Silverman. “If [Christians] are going to have their religious statements made on public land, we’re also going to have our statements made on public land whether they like it or not.” To drive home their opposition to the tablets, the atheist monument will also be engraved with a list of Old Testament punishments for breaking the Ten Commandments, including stoning and death. The point, says Silverman, is to shed light on the “hateful” side of the Bible.

(MORE: America’s First Atheist Monument is a 1,500-Pound Granite Bench)

Ironically, some of the most vocal criticism of the new atheist monument comes from other atheists, who are annoyed that the monument references the Ten Commandments at all. Luis Perez of Tampa, Florida commented on the group’s Facebook page: “This isn’t a victory for us, it is a victory for the theists. There should be NO representation of any agenda.” Another commenter, David Lavoie, wrote, “I think getting a monument instead of them taking the commandments down is a failure.”

Twenty percent of the U.S. public say they do not identify with any religion, according to a 2012 Pew Research Center survey. And while the atheist monument has evoked strong reactions, the vast majority of atheists may not care about the monument that much because they are not involved with organized groups in the first place. “They’re not obsessed with fighting religion or arguing about it,” says Phil Zuckerman, a sociology professor at Pitzer College in Claremont, California.

(MORE: Atheists Plan Live Hotline for Religious Doubters)

The group that erected the neighboring Ten Commandments tablets says it has no hard feelings about the new atheist monument. “We’ll bring coolers full of bottled water, be hospitable and kind and show we’re not angry,” says Ken Weaver, one of the leaders of the Community Men’s Fellowship.

Despite the uproar over the monument, it’s actually one of the least provocative gestures the group has made. In the past, American Atheists have flown banners that read “God-LESS America” on Independence Day, run bus ads proclaiming “You don’t need God,” and replaced nativity scenes at a Santa Monica, Calif. park with a sign that read “Religions are all alike — founded upon fables and mythologies.” In contrast, the new monument just looks like a form of biblical criticism. Barry Kosmin, Director of the Institute for the Study of Secularism in Society and Culture at Trinity College, notes, “The Founding Fathers quotes are not atheist quotes, they’re separationist quotes, because the Founding Fathers don’t qualify as atheists as we define it today.”

 

MORE:Nativity-Scene Battles: Score One for the Atheists

MORE: Packages Sealed with ‘Atheist’ Tape 10 Times More Likely to Disappear, Study Says

280 comments
CharlesBlankenship
CharlesBlankenship

EXPOSE THE GOP,TEALIBAN LIES & ATTEMPTS 2 HIJACK OUR DEMOCRACY & MAKE IT A #Dollarocracy Guess Who Was Atheist & Liberal >   “Of all the animosities which have existed among mankind, those which are caused by a difference of sentiments in religion appear to be the most inveterate and distressing, and ought to be deprecated. I was in hopes that the enlightened and liberal policy, which has marked the present age, would at least have reconciled Christians of every denomination so far that we should never again see the religious disputes carried to such a pitch as to endanger the peace of society.”

~George Washington

CharlesBlankenship
CharlesBlankenship

Gee If Only Someone Instrumental In The Creation of "Our Government" Could Be Quoted As 2 Why Religion Should have no Place In Our Laws & Legislation Someone Like George Washington Maybe.......... “If I could conceive that the general government might ever be so( reference 2 the "Ideology" based Fascism we have today just as he feared) administered as to render the liberty of conscience insecure, I beg you will be persuaded, that no one would be more zealous than myself to establish effectual barriers against the horrors of spiritual tyranny, and every species of religious persecution.”

~George Washington

JasonPlessas
JasonPlessas

Not sure whether to appreciate atheists trying to copy religion...or laugh at their increasingly cringe-worthy attempts. 

JackDorso
JackDorso

Well, at least they won't have to worry about someone desecrating this. I mean, what's the point?

LeeMiller
LeeMiller

Perhaps they should instead quote the atheist who murdered and dismembered Madalyn Murray O'Hair and her family so that he could drain the American Atheist bank accounts and buy gold coins?

mrsax2000
mrsax2000

Always amazed at how upset people get when something happens that calls into question their religion or their perception of the world.  Tastes great.  Less filling.  It would be a better world if everyone could just accept the fact that others believe different things.

jayare1
jayare1

And God spake all these words, saying,

I am the Lord thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.

1.

Thou shalt have no other gods before me.

2.

Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the Lord thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me; And shewing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments.

3.

Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain; for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.

4.

Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: But the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.

5.

Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.

6.

Thou shalt not kill.

7.

Thou shalt not commit adultery.

8.

Thou shalt not steal.

9.

Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour.

10.

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbour's.

spamthisaddress61
spamthisaddress61

That was really sweet of the heathen to place that bench for the Godly to read and enjoy the commandments in comfort. 

Verimius
Verimius

This may not be the first public monument to atheism as the article claims. There is a monument to Atheists in Foxholes at Lake Hypatia, Alabama.

thehonestdoubter
thehonestdoubter

How long before the followers of the "Good Book" deface public property in the name of Jesus? Unfortunately, my money is on it'll last less than a month before being defaced.  Some people are REALLY sensitive about an opposing view being expressed with just as much conviction as their own.

Verimius
Verimius

How about a monument to Jainism? And Wicca? And Islam (both Shia and Sunni), and Yoruba and Santeria and the Greco-Roman gods and the Norse gods and Scientology and Epicurianism and Animism and Hinduism and Sikhism and all the branches of Christianity and Baha'i and Zoroastrianism and Buddhism and Pastafarianism and on and on and on. 

In fact, I'd like to see the area become so cluttered with monuments that the county would have to remove them all as a hazard to foot traffic.

Cookevie
Cookevie

"If there is no God, then why go through all of the trouble to prove that He does not exist?"  "The fool has said in his heart, "There is no God." (Psalm 14:1)

MoreySoffo
MoreySoffo

An old Gahan Wilson cartoon shows a large group of people worshiping Nothing.  A bystander in the back of the crowd asks one of the worshippers, "Is Nothing sacred?"  

JamesBenjaminWales
JamesBenjaminWales

Most of the 10 commandments are good things to live by no matter what religion one believes in and even if one doesn't believe in a higher power at all.  Don't steal, murder, lie, etc.

Inspired
Inspired

Cant we all just get along?  Believe what ever you want to believe. Quit all this arguing and get along at least well enough to make a positive UNITED STATES people. We are making our country weak by not being United. Maybe we can agree to disagree and be done with it. 

CharlesRaymondMiller
CharlesRaymondMiller

I was at the dedication of this secular monument to equality, a value that this nation should stand for and strive to uphold.  What did I see on full display by the protesters?  Racism and Neo-Confederate Nationalism from the League of the South.  Deliberate attempts to interfere with the Right of Assembly and Free Speech by a group of local citizens, blasting bad Christian Country Music and horns during the speeches.  Christian Apologists, ignorant of the penalties proscribed by the so-called 10 Commandments that require them to stone this writer to death.  An attempt by another to desecrate the Atheist Monument.  A statement by another that there is no such thing as atheists.   

I would like to think that that kind of thinking is extremely rare and a product of the event.  Then I see the comments here, some ignorant, some hateful and I am reminded of the fruits the Christianity has born in America.  We have a lot of work to do.

Charles Miller
Regional Director, American Atheists, Alabama


justhowIseeit
justhowIseeit

This monument is an arguing monument- rather than standing on its own beliefs.

JillyA
JillyA

The quotes on the AA bench are verifiable, i.e. they are contemporaneously documented, unlike anything in the Bible. Too bad they don't support your "Christian Nation" ideology. It was not Christianity or the Bible that the Founders looked to for inspiration in writing the Constitution, but the ideals of the Enlightenment. Look it up.

 Regarding hospitals, according to Wikipedia:

"In ancient cultures, religion and medicine were linked. The earliest documented institutions aiming to provide cures were ancient Egyptiantemples. In ancient Greece, temples dedicated to the healer-god Asclepius, known as Asclepieia functioned as centres of medical advice, prognosis, and healing.[2] Asclepeia provided carefully controlled spaces conducive to healing and fulfilled several of the requirements of institutions created for healing.[3] Under his Roman name Æsculapius, he was provided with a temple (291 BC) on an island in the Tiber in Rome, where similar rites were performed.[4]

Have you seen the caduceus, (the staff entwined by a snake) that represents the medical sciences? That is the symbol of the god Asclepius. 

Your "history" teacher is ignorant or lying to you. Shame on him/her for feeding you erroneous information.



realitycheck100
realitycheck100

Fascinating. I learned in a history class that the concept of a hospital was begun by the Christians. That's why you see so many hospitals still under a Christian denominational covering today because it's the historical legacy. Do they even know that? Also the country was historically founded by Christians and anyone knows who has studied many of the founders that they were believers and attended christian church. To put that on the monument is a complete lie and a denial of our heritage and factual history to write what they wrote. At least live in the factual truth even if you don't believe in God don't erect a monument that has a bunch of lame statements on it that are lies and that anyone historically can read through! They could have done better than that. It's kind of laughable! I get the impression they really don't know what they believe.

DaveWinstonSmith
DaveWinstonSmith

I think they forgot some parts for their "monument" : “An atheist believes God should be eradicated from ALL American ideals, both public and private. And any mention of God to an atheist, should be considered a 'hate crime'. Punishable to the highest extent of the 'law'."

TonyCossio
TonyCossio

@thehonestdoubterYour statement is irrelevant.  What people do, or don't do, has no bearing on whether God exists or whether religion is good or bad.

ThoughtfulPosts
ThoughtfulPosts

@JamesBenjaminWales  

Responses to commandments:

1. I am the Lord thy God  -  No thanks. That's not a diverse principle. Many people believe in one god, multiple gods, general supernatural but not deities, or no supernatural or gods. No thanks.

2. Thou shalt have no other gods before me  -  Besides admitting that other concepts of gods exist, which is good, this goes against the ideal of Freedom of Religion. No thanks.

 3. Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image (idols)  -   Idols can be anything. Some people even make their Christianity into idolatry, including for sake of this article a monument of the Commandments. No thanks.

4. Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain  -  This is opposed to the idea of Free Speech. Also there is no definitive line to what it means to take the name in vain, so it could also be thought crime. No thanks.

5. Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy  -  You shouldn't have to keep holy anything you don't believe is holy. Also we secularists endorse this thing known as the "weekend" which really puts this notion away. Secular version, no thanks.

6. Honour thy father and thy mother  -  I would append this to be "Honour thy father and thy mothers, thy fathers, or thy mothers" for those LGBT rights. Good idea if you have respectable parents to respect them. Of course if you disrespected them in the Bible when the Commandments were written that meant being stoned to death. Good idea, religion not necessary for it.

7. Thou shalt not kill  - Good idea, but if you need a Commandment or religion to tell you this I'm scared for you. This morality/ethicality existed before the Bible and will exist after. (Also, this commandment mainly applied for people inside the Hebrew community when it was written. Outsiders were regularly killed and exterminated.)

8. Thou shalt not commit adultery  -  While it is good idea if you're committed to hold to the commitments you've made (unless some form of abuse or such is present), adultery also covers things like consensual premarital sex. The punishment for breaking this was also death by stoning. No thanks.

9.  Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour  -  Don't lie. Good idea. Glad this idea existed in morality and ethics before the Commandments were written. Good idea, but there's a secular version, so no thanks.

10. Thou shalt not cover  -  Thought crime, no thanks. This one says for intents and purposes not to desire anything that isn't yours. Well everything we start out with isn't ours. People buy things because they covet them. People do things because they want them. Not even going to though this one.

Summary: You have the first five commandments which are expressly religious and personal, of which part of one of those could be considered a good idea. Then you have the next two which are good ideas, acceptable. You have one that doesn't pass muster. One that follows that is great. And a final one that is thought crime and to be discarded.

So overall you could say there is three of ten commandments that are good ideas. two which could be good ideas with a lot of reworking, and five which are expressly no something every person would want to follow, nor should they. So if three of ten is a majority to you, go ahead then.

tokerjnk
tokerjnk

@CharlesRaymondMiller 

I'm not sure whether I should be surprised or not that someone like you is a "regional director" of American Atheists. Sad for humanity, but ultimately good for your opponents.

tokerjnk
tokerjnk

@CharlesRaymondMiller 

Oh boy, Charles. Wouldst thou only look behind you at the flood of atheistic hatred, arrogance and bile that is spewed from every corner of the internet, especially in forums like this. Are you so blind, or simply wilfully ignorant of the effects of the ideology to which you hold, or the behaviour of its followers? I can barely go a day without being reminded of the fruits the Atheism has born in America. Indeed, we have so much work to do. So much.

ATLWmn
ATLWmn

@justhowIseeit   Well said!  I'm all for them having equal opportunities to tout their beliefs (or lack thereof), but it reminds me of those commercials where a company just tells you how much better they are than the competition, instead of just telling you how great they are.  

It's a nice quote, but it is worth mentioning that religious institutions want the same thing (even if some hypocrites in them don't).  That quote makes it seem like the religious do nothing but pray, and wish war and poverty on the world while standing idly by.  Jesus preached the opposite.  But I guess if this group wanted to prove their point, that it's easy to manipulate the ignorant with words, they've done it.

tokerjnk
tokerjnk

@JillyA

Ah, right. We should actually throw most non-recent texts in the trash. Unreliable nonsense, all of it. /sarcasm. Or, you could do some research into the historical origins and veracity of the Bible and its contents?

Who are you speaking to, anyway? ("your...ideology").

"It was not Christianity or the Bible that the Founders looked to for inspiration in writing the Constitution, but the ideals of the Enlightenment. Look it up."

Or, YOU could, and then come back and explain why you flat-out lied? Oh no, a reference about how hospitals have ancient Greek origins! Religion/Christianity busted!!! *facepalm*. Try much, much harder, Jill.

TonyCossio
TonyCossio

@JillyA You are so ignorant, its hard where to begin.  You are aware that Thomas Jefferson had nothing to do with the Constitution?  No?  Look it up.  You are aware that those who did have dozens of quotes supporting the FACT that this country was founded on Christian Principles?  No?  Look it up.  I would start with George Washington's Thanks Giving Proclamation.  Not with a quote from someone busy fornicating with his slaves.

MickieLynnHalley
MickieLynnHalley

@realitycheck100 yeah you might want to look elsewhere for verification of that. unless you are referring to greek gods then you might have a small loose point.

h4rr4r
h4rr4r

@realitycheck100 

Your history education is pathetic. Hospitals existed centuries before Christianity. Many of the founders were diests and would not have been regular church goers.

I get the impression you don't really know much of anything.

RichWilson
RichWilson

@DaveWinstonSmith 

Funny, I just googled for your text in quotes, and the only source was your comment here.  Since you're quoting something, I'm going to invoke my "citation please" card.

JillyA
JillyA

@DaveWinstonSmith 

Nope. Just public spaces owned by the government.  According to the Enlightment Clause of the First Amendment and upheld by numerous Supreme Court decisions, it is when the government agrees with a particular religion  and imposes it on the rest of us, like adding "under God" in the Pledge or "In God We Trust"on our money, that some, not all, atheists have a problem with.

Would "in Allah or Shiva We Trust" be okay with you? If not, then how about going back to the original secular motto of "E Pluribus Unum" (Out of Many, One) on our money?

thehonestdoubter
thehonestdoubter

@TonyCossio @thehonestdoubter Are we both reading the same article? I was posting about the monument mentioned in the article and the likelihood that it will be defaced given the history of billboards posted by the same group. My statement would be irrelevant if I were actually arguing about whether God exists or not, but I wasn't and it would necessitate an extremely strained reading of my comment to come to that conclusion. By the way, this article isn't about whether god exists or not. It's about the first amendment and the uncomfortable relationship with free speech zones on public property and religion. 

Joyell
Joyell

That was a decent summary of Christopher Hitchens's work, with a few misquotes.

JillyA
JillyA

@TonyCossio @JillyA  LOL. You Christian Nation types must chafe at the fact that the Constitution makes no mention of Christianity, God,  or Jesus, even though the Founders who drafted it had plenty of chances to do so. So you try to bolster your point by posting quotes that have nothing to do with the Constitution. Oh, well.


TonyCossio
TonyCossio

@JillyAI guess your Google Machine is broke so I will help you out:

George Washington
1st U.S. President

"While we are zealously performing the duties of good citizens and soldiers, we certainly ought not to be inattentive to the higher duties of religion. To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest glory to add the more distinguished character of Christian."
--The Writings of Washington, pp. 342-343.

John Adams
2nd U.S. President and Signer of the Declaration of Independence

"Suppose a nation in some distant Region should take the Bible for their only law Book, and every member should regulate his conduct by the precepts there exhibited! Every member would be obliged in conscience, to temperance, frugality, and industry; to justice, kindness, and charity towards his fellow men; and to piety, love, and reverence toward Almighty God ... What a Eutopia, what a Paradise would this region be."
--Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, Vol. III, p. 9.

"The general principles, on which the Fathers achieved independence, were the only Principles in which that beautiful Assembly of young Gentlemen could Unite, and these Principles only could be intended by them in their address, or by me in my answer. And what were these general Principles? I answer, the general Principles of Christianity, in which all these Sects were United: And the general Principles of English and American Liberty, in which all those young Men United, and which had United all Parties in America, in Majorities sufficient to assert and maintain her Independence.

"Now I will avow, that I then believe, and now believe, that those general Principles of Christianity, are as eternal and immutable, as the Existence and Attributes of God; and that those Principles of Liberty, are as unalterable as human Nature and our terrestrial, mundane System."
--Adams wrote this on June 28, 1813, excerpt from a letter to Thomas Jefferson.

"The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary Festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever."
--Adams wrote this in a letter to his wife, Abigail, on July 3, 1776.

Thomas Jefferson
3rd U.S. President, Drafter and Signer of the Declaration of Independence

"God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the Gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever; That a revolution of the wheel of fortune, a change of situation, is among possible events; that it may become probable by Supernatural influence! The Almighty has no attribute which can take side with us in that event."
--Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XVIII, p. 237.

"I am a real Christian – that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus Christ."
--The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, p. 385.

John Hancock
1st Signer of the Declaration of Independence

"Resistance to tyranny becomes the Christian and social duty of each individual. ... Continue steadfast and, with a proper sense of your dependence on God, nobly defend those rights which heaven gave, and no man ought to take from us."
--History of the United States of America, Vol. II, p. 229.

Benjamin Franklin
Signer of the Declaration of Independence and Unites States Constitution

"Here is my Creed. I believe in one God, the Creator of the Universe. That He governs it by His Providence. That He ought to be worshipped.

"That the most acceptable service we render to him is in doing good to his other children. That the soul of man is immortal, and will be treated with justice in another life respecting its conduct in this. These I take to be the fundamental points in all sound religion, and I regard them as you do in whatever sect I meet with them.

"As to Jesus of Nazareth, my opinion of whom you particularly desire, I think the system of morals and his religion, as he left them to us, is the best the world ever saw, or is likely to see;

"But I apprehend it has received various corrupting changes, and I have, with most of the present dissenters in England, some doubts as to his divinity; though it is a question I do not dogmatize upon, having never studied it, and think it needless to busy myself with it now, when I expect soon an opportunity of knowing the truth with less trouble. I see no harm, however, in its being believed, if that belief has the good consequence, as probably it has, of making his doctrines more respected and more observed; especially as I do not perceive, that the Supreme takes it amiss, by distinguishing the unbelievers in his government of the world with any peculiar marks of his displeasure."

TonyCossio
TonyCossio

You're surprised that someone came up an original thought?  He was not quoting anybody you fool.

tokerjnk
tokerjnk

@JillyA

"Nope. Just public spaces owned by the government."

If only that were actually true. I've talked to and listened to more atheists than you, apparently.

TomBower
TomBower

@tokerjnk@TomBower

'Tis YOU my friend who are the ignorant one. Religion has fostered more ignorance in the world than anything I can think of. You are an apologist and a fool. Consider:

Religion needs to be held up for the sham that it is. Why? Because there is a fundamentalist movement in this country...a very dangerous movement that would like to see Christianity take an active role in shaping our laws. They would have creationist nonsense taught in our schools and try to pass evolution off as wrong. They are already attempting to pass laws regarding abortion, contraception and gay marriage, ALL of which are based on nothing but religious dogma.

Read "The Family" by Jeff Sharlet (2007) and you'll be afraid...VERY afraid. These people are even worse than the fundies....and they are in our government in very high places.

We must be vigilant, not apathetic and adopt a "live and let live" attitude.

These sociopaths need to know that they are being watched.


tokerjnk
tokerjnk

@TomBower

Thank you, Tom, for displaying your sheer ignorance of religion in general and many in particular (regarding roots, beliefs and practices of the huge variety of religions). It is not what you want it to be, though, however much you wish, and however much you keep telling yourself and others.

TonyCossio
TonyCossio

@JillyA @TonyCossio Noone ever said it was a religious document, you are changing the argument.  You said the USC makes no mention of God - you were proven wrong, now you are changing the argument to the USC being a religious document.  Can't tell if trolling or retarded.

JillyA
JillyA

@TonyCossio @JillyA 

Phrases like "In the Year of Our Lord"  were common colloquialisms  in that time.

 If that  is all you have to hang your hat on to prove that the Constitution is a religious document, it's pretty silly.



TonyCossio
TonyCossio

@JillyA@TonyCossioGuess you missed the part "In the Year of our Lord".  It's in In Article VII if you ever bothered to actually read the USC.

JillyA
JillyA

@TonyCossio @JillyA @DaveWinstonSmith 

That's because SCOTUS has never had a case  involving "UG" and "IGWT" brought before it. Dr. Michael Newdow tried to argue that it was un-Constitutional for the State of California to make his daughter say "UG" in the Pledge, but his case was dismissed by the Court, ruling that not being the custodial parent, he didn't have standing to represent her. IOW, his case was thrown out on a technicality, not that it didn't have sound Constitutional merit.