Coca-Cola’s New Bottle Is Made of Ice

... but it's only available in Colombia

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Good news for those of you who enjoy a nice cold Coke: the company has rolled out a new bottle made entirely from frozen water. Bad news for those of you who don’t live in Colombia: It’s only available in Colombia.

This icy new drinking vessel is shaped like the traditional glass Coke bottle and has the company’s name etched into the ice, according to Coca Cola’s website. Alas, right now you can only find it in Colombia, and there’s no word yet if Coke will introduce it in any other countries. But apparently it’s pretty popular so far — according to the site, beachside vendors have sold an average of 265 bottles per hour.

(MORE: The Real Thing? Original Coca-Cola Recipe Might Be on eBay)

If you’re at least a marginally curious person, then perhaps you’re wondering how this works. Basically, these bottles are made of silicone molds filled with micro-filtered water, frozen to -13° F. Once you’ve drunk all the Coke, the bottle melts away. Oh, and each bottles come equipped with a rubber red band to make it easier to hold the vessel. The band then  doubles as a bracelet. Bonus!

Coke is touting the environmentally friendly nature of these melt-away bottles, but as ABC News points out, they require so much extra refrigeration that it basically cancels out the eco-friendly aspect.

MORE: No Kosher Coca-Cola Available in California for Passover — Again

71 comments
BJJones
BJJones

Still contains cocaine! Mucho gusto!

SuzanneRosenorn
SuzanneRosenorn

America is always the last to get cool things, if at all.

Bill_Owen
Bill_Owen

It would be pretty simple to make a mold and freeze up some beer glasses... must try that.

TimeNinja
TimeNinja

Well the article was a bit on the poorly written side and vague about the most obvious question...is the bottle edible? It says its made "of" a silicon mold. Did they mean of...or from? Generally it is not advisable to eat silicon.

gcvsa
gcvsa

Let's do a little back of the napkin. Soda-lime glass, the type commonly used for drink bottles has a melting point of about 815˚C, a density of 2.44 g/cm^3, and a specific heat of 879 J/kg/˚C. Water has a freezing point of 0˚C, a density of 1 g/cm^3, and a specific heat of 4184 J/kg/˚C.

So:

0.244 kg glass bottle * 795˚C (room temp to melting difference) * 879 J/kg/˚C = 174 KJ input to melt the bottle

0.100 kg ice bottle * -20˚C (room temp to freezing difference) * 4184 J/kg/C = 8.368 KJ input to freeze bottle.

Now, refrigeration is usually less efficient than heating, and you have to keep the bottle frozen until sale. We can assume that this is only going to be profitable in venues where the bottle can be expected to be sold in short order, so let's say it takes ten times the amount of energy to freeze and maintain the bottle before sale as it does to just freeze it. We're still at only 83 KJ.

This doesn't even take into account the fact that glass bottles also require waste collection and disposal or recycling, and it also doesn't even take into account the fact that the calculation assumes you are starting from glass stock in the first place, and not raw materials (silica, soda, lime, etc)

Some of these numbers are pulled out of thin air, (I didn't account for the energy of freezing—is that 80 calories/gram for water?) but I think these calculations show that the lifecycle might be less energy-intensive for the ice bottles. Certainly, it must be profitable, or Coca-Cola wouldn't do it, but the total lifecycle of a bottle doesn't end when Coca-Cola sells it. We have to account for the cost of potential injuries from glass bottles in public places, for one thing. And then, there's the second cycle of this: recycling the glass either requires re-melting it, or sorting and sterilising it, both of which are going to require more energy.

The only questions I have are: A. When can I have one? and 2. How do they keep the soda from freezing?! :D

AmosHogWildSkidmore
AmosHogWildSkidmore

this just in!!! Edward Snowden just puts in request for asylum in columbia

SDRanger
SDRanger

What am I missing here? Coca Cola FREEZES doesn't it? How can the bottle be made of ice and the pop inside NOT freeze? This hasn't occurred to ANYbody?!?

TimeNinja
TimeNinja

Actually important question...can you drink the bottle or not?

MarkOlsen
MarkOlsen

How is the bottle kept frozen while the beverage inside remains a liquid?

highdef2012
highdef2012

... ah, yet another reason to love COKE TREASON..  sends its jobs there, may as well send the new products there, too.  Just another example of American self-destruction.

UncleJohn42
UncleJohn42

Has anyone seen my Coke?  I set it down just a few minutes ago, where that brown puddle is...

KirkBennett
KirkBennett

Coca Cola. Made in the good ole USA but available only in another country. Sounds like our taxes.

khmtk321
khmtk321

This seems a good idea to protect the environment. However, did they think about the cost to keep these bottles freezing?

VincentEarlDavis
VincentEarlDavis

now only if Heineken can come up with a bottle for their beer!!!

punkakes13
punkakes13

i think its dirty.. and also, what is teh quality of the water

and like, it can be eaily contamined..

but its also cool.. but i think peopel can do it at home too.. 

gcvsa
gcvsa

@TimeNinja If you watch the video, you will see people eating their bottles.

iamtanmay
iamtanmay

@gcvsa You are so smart AND attractive ! Amazing ! Its usually a either/or situation.

goblue562
goblue562

@gcvsa Yeah, you just pulled all of those numbers "out of thin air".  You just walk around with the density and specific heat of glass in your head?

gcvsa
gcvsa

Oh, OK, I understand the bottles are filled onsite with fountain product. That makes sense, since the bottles are apparently delivered at -13˚C.

So, to update, let's make it an equivalent total temp change, accounting for the energy of freezing, of -113˚C * 0.1 kg * 4184 J/kg/˚C = 47 KJ

The rest all hinges on how efficient refrigeration is compared to heating, admittedly lower, but that's not the only factor in consideration.

jack_schorsch
jack_schorsch

@@Superabound @SDRanger 


That is only if the thermal energy that the bottle can 'suck' out of the coke is < than the energy it takes to freeze the coke. 

water (and coke) take about 330 J / gm to freeze/melt - while ice is about 2.2 J/gm'C specific heat. That means that a -17 degree bottle, weighing about 300 gms (a ballpark estimate!) has about 11 kJ of cooling capacity (to help freeze the coke). 

That bottle I described would be able to 'freeze' about 33 ml of coke before the entire structure reached 0'. So yes, a little bit of coke would 'freeze' (*note, not sure if there is enough sugar in coke to screw around with the freezing point!!!)

Superabound
Superabound

@SDRanger Does your glass of Coke freeze when you put ice in it? The mass of the liquid Coke is greater than the mass of the frozen ice. The Coke isnt put into the bottle until after its frozen, and its done on-site. The ice wont freeze the Coke; the Coke will melt the ice.

MarkLong
MarkLong

@SDRanger I was curious about the same thing.  It would have to be empty until served.

PhilSmith1
PhilSmith1

@highdef2012 I can't tell if you're trolling or not. If you are, well played. If you're not, you should tighten down your tinfoil hat, the librul lizard-men are coming to steal your guns and install CCTV cameras around your property.

gcvsa
gcvsa

@KirkBennett You don't really think that Coca-Cola is only made in the US, do you? Have you ever been outside this country? Coca-Cola is made locally all over the world. It may have been invented here, but Coca-Cola is a global company right now, and is probably avoiding US taxes like every other company that can afford to do so. So, spare us your false jingoism.

wsoldi
wsoldi

@khmtk321 

most people & stores have freezers already, there wouldn't be any extra cost for me or the stores.

HowardCihak
HowardCihak

@punkakes13 Did you even bother to READ the article.  If you had, you'd have noticed that the water is micro-filtered.  That means it's possibly cleaner than most of the water you've been drinking all your life.

PaulMiller
PaulMiller

@punkakes13  Coca Cola is a company that has been around for more than 100 years they aren't giving anyone contaminated water they are much smarter than that. Their entire business is based around water.

TimeNinja
TimeNinja

So then it's made "from" a silicon mold not made out "of" a silicon mold like the article said.

Bill_Owen
Bill_Owen

@gcvsa I think you are right. Journalists tend to be pretty stupid, especially these days, and ABC prolly has EXXON stocks, so using less plastic would be "good" thing from their POV.

StanleyWasham
StanleyWasham

@gcvsa @KirkBennett  @gcvsa Spare us your opinions on someone else's opinion! Didn't your mother ever tell you  that if you didn't have something nice to say, say nothing at all? Apparently you weren't taught that so grow up!

garylibby
garylibby

But it will displace other products and I could easily see it creating a situation where stores would need to buy more freezers.

apodofin
apodofin

@HowardCihak @punkakes13 It may be micro-filtered, but the bottle can be contaminated from a 1000 different sources since you're literally eating the container.  Workers at the plant, pests in the plant, distributors, stock boys at the grocery store, etc, etc.  Not sure I'd trust it.  

carigis
carigis

@HowardCihak @punkakes13 in all fairness.. certain countries you go to you get sick if you drink anywhere the local ice touches (being from the US and not being used to microbes in the water... always wipe the bottle down with a napkin).  

so I wouldn't be licking the bottles anytime soon if they are stored in ice buckets with local ice water.