Area 51 Is Alive and Unwell

A not-so-close encounter with an American legend

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Area 51 is perhaps the most satisfying legend of American history. Satisfying not only because it screams covert in a way that is literally otherworldly and takes us back to a time of serialized radio stories, but because, despite the nearly-absurd notion of our government maintaining an alien-testing site in the desert, it will always be only nearly-absurd. We can’t look it up on Snopes, or drive past it.  The very magnitude of its absurdity is the one thing that keeps the story alive because it is perhaps the one thing we can never be certain doesn’t exist.

Today that changes—not only has George Washington University’s National Security Archive released declassified documents that prove the existence of an Area 51, but the military facility is also stripped of any mythical glory because the documents also show that Area 51 had nothing to do with Aliens at all. In fact, it was used as a testing site for a Lockheed reconnaissance plane that was used to collect higher-resolution photographs for military intelligence. The facility was originally used as a landing strip during WWII, and after the war the disused strip became the site of operations for the Lockheed aircraft. Although the Lockheed U-2, also knows as the Dragon Lady, has been largely replaced by drones, it is still technically in service.

Area 51 was cheekily nicknamed Paradise Ranch, so that intelligence officers and government employees wouldn’t have to tell their wives that they were moving the family to a rather large fenced-off area in the desert.

Today, as we learn the unnerving truth about the extent of government  surveillance, it would be nice to have a bit of levity. Why can’t we have aliens? Wouldn’t that be nice to find out aliens existed? Instead of Aliens from the 1950’s, all we get is more news about surveillance.

However, it may be easier to think that Area 51 could very well be a brilliantly-deployed smokescreen for alien operations. The government knows that we expect to learn about shady  information gathering tactics. What better way to throw us off the scent of extraterrestrial goings-on than by disappointing us a bit more, and robbing us of all romantic notions about Area 51?

4 comments
TheDers
TheDers

call me when they open it as the first U.S Theme Park payed and run by the government. watch Nevada's income skyrocket!

chester
chester

 @TheBlackVault 

Correct, although, Area 51 or Groom Lake Test Range was mentioned in at least several articles including, Popular Science in 1988 when the Soviets had photographed the site more than a dozen times. Let's remember or recall that Area 49 has several incidents just as polarized as Area 51, nuclear bombing test range... Check out an interesting new book by Mack Maloney (yea, I know), Beyond Area 51... No new news, but at least the shadow is speaking about it.@TheBlackVault

TheBlackVault
TheBlackVault like.author.displayName 1 Like

I don't understand all the fuss about this release. The documents are fascinating, however, the fact these are the 'first' to reference Area 51 is actually false. Under the Freedom of Information Act, I was able to obtain a documented admission to Area 51's existence, back in 2001. I have documents from the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) speaking about Area 51.


http://www.theblackvault.com/m/articles/view/Area-51 

ChristineClarke
ChristineClarke like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

Didn't everybody know that Area 51 was supposed to be an experimental aircraft facility? Even people that thought it was an alien base were familiar with that explanation at least as a "cover story."