11-Story LEGO Tower Is Officially the World’s Tallest

Painstakingly constructed from over 500,000 bricks, the 113-ft. tall tower weighs more than a ton

  • Share
  • Read Later
Delaware Online

As the Beatles said, you’ll get by with a little help from your friends — or, you know, build the world’s tallest LEGO tower with a little help from an entire school district.

MORE: Simpsons Legos Are Coming in 2014

Brick by tiny plastic brick, the students of Red Clay School District toiled for months to assemble sections of a tower comprising over half a million LEGOs. After several days of what Delaware Online describes as “painstaking engineering,” the LEGO brick tower was complete, an improbable “toy” edifice soaring over John Dickinson High School near Wilmington, Delaware flaunting colorful layers of pumpkin orange, electric green and light royal blue.

“Wow. Just — wow,” said Ralph Storner, one of the students who helped build the tower (via Delaware Online). “You know when you’re talking about a world record it’s going to be big. But seeing it now, it’s really cool.”

All told, the tower weighs nearly a ton and stands nearly 113 feet tall, making it the tallest structure composed of toy bricks ever assembled, according to the Guinness Book of World Records (the prior record-holder was a 106-foot tower built in Prague in 2012). The bricks were pieced together in sections by students over the past several months, then those sections were stacked by contractors who’d volunteered to help out, constructing the tower around a metal cylinder and using tension cables to keep it from tipping over.

While the number of feet in a story varies, it’s generally around 10 (think room height plus space for floor and ceiling), allowing the school district to reasonably claim the tower is around 11 stories tall.

Why — aside from fleeting Guinness record notoriety — enlist a bunch of students to build an 11-story-tall LEGO tower at all?

“We want kids to get a message out of this,” said district superintendent Mervin Daugherty. “One kid could never put this together. But when we all work together, when we’re all a team, we can do something that people probably thought would be impossible.”

MORE: Pittsburgh Bridge Gets a ‘Yarn-Bomb’ Makeover

13 comments
cwiz
cwiz

Outside help, support beams, and unnecessary expenditure.  Cool to look at and alright to read about if you're into the sensualization.  But once you start thinking about what's really going on it isn't impressive at all.

SeanGardner
SeanGardner

how can they afford this? Legos are not cheap. 

alansky
alansky

Isn't that special: People working together can do something thought impossible—whether it is worth doing or not.

greatercheese
greatercheese

“We want kids to get a message out of this,” said district superintendent Mervin Daugherty. “One kid could never put this together. But when we all work together, when we’re all a team, we can do something that people probably thought would be impossible.”


Sounds like socialism. This is what you get in Obama's America: Kids working together for the greater good and to achieve a common goal. Disgusting. 

cjh2nd
cjh2nd

why does the picture on the main page that advertises a story about Legos show a stack of Duplos?

Gregory
Gregory

@greatercheese- you are STUPID!  I never use that term. I always back up my comment or opinion with some sort of fact. But, "You're STUPID!" Is just fitting to describe your statement. There is no clarification needed. One only has to read your idiotic statement to learn that you are not a very bright individual.

DanBruce
DanBruce

@greatercheese Someone has to think of the greater good. They can't all be young Republicans!

WorldsAway
WorldsAway

@DanBruce @greatercheese But each child had his/her individual drive to stick with it. Teamwork is necessary; but individual drive is the cornerstone of personal development. Without it who would organize the team?