The Double Stuf Oreo May Be Missing Some Stuf

Scandal ensues

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Bill Hogan / MCT / Getty Images

Double Stuf Heads or Tails cookies by Oreo.

The 18½ minutes missing from Nixon’s White House tapes? Fine, ok. French winemakers putting antifreeze in their product? Not that big a deal. This week the nation is faced with a true scandal, a fiasco at the heart of which lies the fate of our notion of truth and goodness: Double Stuf Oreos do not actually contain twice the stuf as normal Oreos, CNN reports.

Thanks to the tireless efforts of a math class at a high school in upstate New York, we’ve finally been able to get hold of the truth. We all know that the Stuf is the main part of the Oreo, and that the choice between the not-fantastic cookies and the creamy center is an obvious one.

(MORE: Oreo’s Latest Limited-Edition Flavor: Watermelon)

Leave it to the children—innocent as they were—who probably only wanted to assure themselves that Nabisco was indeed delivering the double stuf promised on the box, to solve the mystery nobody else had the audacity to tackle. Nabisco is being very glib about the findings, sending a spokesperson to announce that the cookies do indeed contain twice as much, even though the math class found that it contained only 1.86 times as much stuf as regular Oreos. Last time we checked, double wasn’t an approximation, but a mathematical phrase signifying “twice as much.”

It is upsetting  that Nabisco believes it can pull the wool over our eyes this way. If Trader Joe’s offered double stuf Joe Joes, they would undoubtedly have made sure that there was actually twice as much creme between the two cookies. Let us recall the famous scene in Big, in which Tom Hanks eats Oreos by licking off the creme center and throwing the cookie part away, proving not only that the creme is the best, but that the food is itself a source of comfort. Would Tom Hanks have eaten Oreos to bring him back to childhood had he known that Nabisco was just another company looking to cheat its customers?

Perhaps the biggest tragedy is the retroactive death of the quadruple stuf Oreos, made by taking apart two double stuf Oreos and putting the two halves together. Today we learn that we were hardly pioneers of an intense cookie experience four times as great as a normal Oreo. Instead we were really eating a cookie that was only just over three times as big as a normal Oreo, and nothing more.

MORE: Customers Sue Subway after ‘Footlong’ Sandwich Fails to Measure Up

77 comments
bassfxero
bassfxero

Humor on Time? I thought I was reading Cracked for a second there.

CindyJ
CindyJ

I have suspected the cream amount  in both original  and double Stuf have been reduced.  Say it isn't so Nabisco.  

rigby_eleanor
rigby_eleanor

@Karaoklee I’m so sorry I didn’t think to research this topic myself for my graduate thesis.

VBeesThree
VBeesThree

@BlancoDiddy Shocking. How will I ever sleep tonight now that this bombshell has been dropped?? Heehee.

KevinKeifer
KevinKeifer

I have done a test like this in my classroom for 5 years now. We did have a few differences, such as we actually weighed the cream on samples of 5 cookies instead of subtracting out the cookie weight (which introduces the chance for more error) and repeated these samples many times throughout the class. We used weight and not volume, mainly because weight is easier to measure. Performing a simple t-test has confirmed, over and over again, that double stuff really are double stuff. (and for you statistic people, yes, we did compensate for the normal Oreo being 2x double stuff when calculating standard error)

This test only compares averages, which tells us nothing. For example, if you have many stacks of 10 pennies, are they all exactly the same height? No, they are not, yet they all contain 10 pennies. The conclusion with this Oreo test would be the same as saying, "Because the stacks of pennies are not exactly the same height, they are not all worth ten cents."

I can only hope that his class was algebra or a pre algebra class, otherwise he wasted his instructional time. If he was teaching statistics, he failed utterly on many levels. I am also surprised that many major news outlets are covering this story without doing just a tad of investigation first.  It is pretty irresponsible to state that Nabicso is "another company looking to cheat its customers" based on one high school's test of one sample.

I am not the only teacher who does a test like this for Oreos, either.  A few emails to ask the rest of us about our results, or maybe confirming the test results yourself, before making a statement approaching slander would have been a nice thing to see from the mainstream media.

MrMosser
MrMosser

@TIME Ten cookies is not good science. WHS science students used 72 cookies today and got 2.03x stuffing for double stuff vs. regular.

FightWinDrink
FightWinDrink

@sheena_hunter must have been using significant figures in which case 1.86=2 but to be honest I never trusted them.

NobodyBeatsTheB
NobodyBeatsTheB

@KiraBind perhaps we should have know by their refusal to use the second 'f' when they named the product

ahmdahmd208
ahmdahmd208

@TIME هايييييييييييييييييييييييييييييي