We Are All This Weeping Toddler Who Had a Breakdown Over the New iOS 7

For one young boy in Kansas, iOS 7 is a total nightmare

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So far, reactions to Apple’s new iOS 7 have been rather mixed. As TIME’s Matt Peckham writes, there are plenty of pros to the new operating system — but also plenty of cons. (Some pros: Siri can be a dude, and multitasking is much easier. Some cons: the launch-day-download traffic jam, and there’s a steeper-than-usual learning curve.)

For one young boy in Kansas, though, iOS 7 is just a total nightmare. His dad updated his iPad to the new system and then recorded his 4-year-old son’s reaction to the changes — which can really only be described with the words “complete meltdown.” As the toddler expresses his extreme disapproval, his dad tells him, “You’re just going to have to get used to it.” He manages to reply, between heavy sobs, “No. I don’t want to.” Oh man. You’re not alone, pal. Plenty of people are just as upset as you are. We feel your pain.

MORE: 6 Reasons to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Away and 5 You Shouldn’t

MORE: Design Student Creates Side-by-Side iOS 6 and iOS 7 Icon Comparison 

22 comments
Mama
Mama

Not to keep posting, but for parents like me, who were just searching for a way to tailor iOS 7 to a toddlers needs. My best advice is to use Settings, General, Accessibility,  Guided Access. It means I have to put him into the game I want, and he will need my help to get back out. He's not going to like it, but I think I will. Also, I don't want my little guy blinding himself with the flashlight, so for that you would go to Settings, Control Centre, and then just turn all the access off. He'll still be able to access it if he's not locked into his game, so I'll have to start putting it up and he'll have to ask for it from now on. He's not going to like that either, but oh well. It's either that or don't update. Not sure what I'll do yet. Still considering possible solutions.

Mama
Mama

Also, I don't think this kid's future opportunities will be ruined because of this harmless little video. By the time he grows up, it'll likely be understood that people are multifaceted and complex beings who are not justly defined based on video clips or even certain ages and stages of life. We are in constant flux, growing, developing, learning, maturing. I barely remember what he looks like and I saw it ten minutes ago. Relax, people. It's not going to make a difference to anyone who matters.

Mama
Mama

Haha, that was cute. People need to lighten up. My son is 2 and he has an iPhone and guess what? He can count, he knows the alphabet, shapes, colours, etc.. He knows way more than I did at his age and his iPhone gets most of the credit for that. When he learns to stop throwing the phone, then he'll get an iPad. The days of kick the can and meander around in the streets till the streetlights come on are history. And good riddance. Kids are safer at home &/or doing organized sports & activities. Unfortunately for the parents who can't stay up to date, their kids will miss out on the more lucrative opportunities in life. Sad but true. Anyways, it was just a cute little video of a kid being a kid, and an article that was clearly just poking a bit of fun. It put a smile on my face. Thanks.

bojimbo26
bojimbo26

As has been mentioned on newsgroups , ios7 was not said about in the video . ( Could be he wanted to use grown up potty and not child potty ) .

UnniN
UnniN

Ms Grossman's article itself is so silly and shallow! Using a 4-year old's reaction as a benchmark for acceptability of software upgrade is facetious and if intended as a joke it is in poor taste. 

So many things are odd here--why for instance did the father broadcast his son's reaction to the unfamiliar software to the world? When will we free ourselves from the compulsion of putting everything that happens in our lives out in there in the cyberworld? Is there no joy in privacy? 

Some have recommended disciplining the child.  I disagree. The little fellow is NOT  the one that requires disciplining -- many of the judgemental adults here and first and foremost his father unfortunately are the ones who do -- the 4 yr old responded like any other kid at that age when confronted with a strange and unfamiliar thing that replaced something he was absolutely thrilled with (presumably) earlier. Today kids cry about iPads, the previous generation's kids cried about action toys, and still earlier generation kids cried about rubber balls or plastic dolls and maybe centuries ago kids probably did not have any attention from the adults who thought that childhood was  not meant for joy but a stern  upbringing! 

It is not our business whether the father should or should not have given his child an iPad ... for all you know the kid is a brilliant prodigy! (Mozart was given a piano when around the same age and you know what young Amadeus managed to do with it). Why get so judgemental? And why talk of punishing him for his outburst which is entirely natural?

But the notion that our little little joys and sorrows are being broadcast to the wide world seems to me to take the fun out of everyday living.  

----

Emaad
Emaad

I updated to ios 7! And found it really better! So I think that people were used to that old look of ios that's why they need some time to accept it! More over there are some bugs in it! But I hope so they will be fixed as soon as the next minor update arrives!

RobertSF
RobertSF

When I was 4, the closest thing I had to a smartphone was an Etch-A-Sketch.

dsuden
dsuden

Oh, puleeeze!! I agree, you truly are a weepy toddler, if this is the kind of thing in life that upsets you. Really, get a life. Hint: It isn't found in your electronic device.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

When I was 4 years old, it was 1991.  At that time, as a toddler, I did not have a cell phone/smartphone, iPad, iPod, laptop, Wii, or any kind of video gaming system.  The only 'toys' I had were action figures, board games, stuffed animals, and pool toys.  Oh, and I also had a tricycle, baseball, and soccer gear as well (maybe hiking boots by then too).  Add to that a newly-born baby sister, and I had a lot to keep my attention.

Why do I list all of those random items?  The reason is they point to two common activities:  1) playing with other people, and 2) being outside everyday.  There would have been no way I would have ever (been allowed to) throw a Grade A Hissyfit over some electronic appliance.  With absolute confidence, there is also no way in Hell my father would have gotten me on VHS (remember those?) doing so.  At all times, he was a father first, and a wannabe comedian second.

It's depressing that our society celebrates - and then TIME Magazine publishes - such acts of appalling stupidity.  That father should be telling his child to 'get over himself,' and instead think about how truly blessed he is in life.

imofanopinion
imofanopinion

This is so totally stupid.  First, we have no idea what he is crying about...secondly - how typical of today's kids.  Can't have it their way lets just fall to pieces or act like idiots and their parents going along with it.  No child at that age needs an ipad, another family letting their child depend on an electronic babysitter and entertainment center.  No wonder kids today are so desensitized to the real world...they lock themselves in their homes with "gadgets" parents buy for them and no longer know how to interact in person.  They play killing games and look how many are out there killing others in real life -    Make that child go out and play, help in the house, etc.  And stop videotaping your kids for the general public while you are at it

DanBruce
DanBruce

Well, at least he still has network/cable TV and movies that are aimed at 4-year-ols.

rhylanor
rhylanor

What an utter first world problem.  I'm sure the poor child will get over it, especially because at 4 their critical judgement of a device OS is "it looks different".

AndyG
AndyG

4yr old with an ipad eh

Derekcolling
Derekcolling

@mrbomb13 You viewed a 17 second slice of my sons life and now you feel you're in a position to judge. Do you honestly think he never goes outside, never plays board games or have any stuffed animals, really? Really.

TonyPerry
TonyPerry

@Derekcolling @mrbomb13 Mr. Colling, the best thing you can do is ignore this comments section completely.  Internet anonymity and the modern "I have an absolutely correct opinion based on a tiny amount of information and I have the God given right to tell everyone about it" sense of entitlement will just bring you grief.  The world is full of self-appointed experts who will tell you what a horrible parent you have been based on these seventeen seconds, and who will all claim that they themselves were perfect angels who managed to make it through their entire childhood without ever having a little meltdown.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@Derekcolling @mrbomb13

First, thank you for your reply.  Just a few comments in response:

1) I never said or implied that I was qualified to judge your son's life in general.  However, given the video clip you posted (and the TIME article to which you apparently consented), it's fair and reasonable to comment on (and not judge) your son's reaction.  That reaction amounted to a temper tantrum over a software update, and that struck me as odd - especially when I thought of how little a role technology played in our lives when we were only 4 years old.

2) While I spoke about my life, I never said or implied that your son never went outside, played board games, or had stuffed animals.  That was an incorrect inference which you drew on your own.

3) Since your son is only 4, I am not at all judging him.  Instead (if you read the rest of my comment), I'm judging you, sir.  I judge you, because you are the adult in this situation.  While parents occasionally tape the 'memorable instances' of their children, it's another thing entirely to post those instances to Internet sites like Youtube (as you apparently did).  What on Earth would possess you to do such a thing?  Do you think it's funny to post videos of your crying child for the entire world to see?  Your 4-year old son may not know the difference between right and wrong, but it would be reasonable to expect that his father (you) would.  To make your poor son the Laugh of the Moment on Youtube is deplorable.

If you actually look at your video's page (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTpXVv-DaBQ), you'll notice that I'm not the only commenter who feels that sentiment.  Additionally, you'll notice that some of the commenters are making far worse remarks than I made on this page.  Will you call them out as you called me out? 

Either way, it's fair to say that you brought this criticism on yourself.

As a child is typically told, you should've know better.

venom_aa
venom_aa

@mrbomb13 oh and forgot...iOS is crap..and you are only mad at the parent cause you cant talk trash about you dumbphone Iphone. :D

venom_aa
venom_aa

@mrbomb13 

And your the perfect example of not reading in context, the video does not imply neither that the kid is spoiled, or that the parent is being irresponsable in uploading up a video of him to the internet. The context here is the iOS7 is so bad it made a kid cry., if you cant see that even when the title says it well, it puts you totally in the definition of an internet troll.
And as objection to your way out the universe context, you expose yourself and your kids to everyday criticism in the real world, being in the supermarket or the street, or in family reunion, unless you live in bubble. So your even wrong in that. Only difference here is that you can read such stupid and hypocrite criticism here, and you can only wonder what people talk on your back on the real world

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

@TonyPerry @Derekcolling @mrbomb13 

No one on this page is claiming to have an, "absolutely correct opinion" on child rearing, or anything else for that matter.  Additionally, no one on this page claimed to 1) be 'perfect angels' as children, and 2) to never have a meltdown. 

What infuriates many people is that Mr. Colling did not keep his son's outburst within the confines of his own home.  Instead, for whatever reason, he broadcast that outburst to the Internet - for millions of people to see. 

The main question is whether you would want your child to be subject to the laughter, scorn, criticism (etc.) of the general public.  If you see no issue with that, and believe that to be within the 'normal bounds' of parenting, than I genuinely feel sorry for you and for any kids you may have one day.