Brewed Awakening: Extra Credit For Beer Field Trip Has Parents Drunken Mad

Was part of science lesson on fermentation

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Parents at a Colorado school are outraged their kids were encouraged to visit the local Coors brewery to earn extra credit in science class.

The teacher wanted students to learn about the brewing process as part of a lesson on fermentation. But Adrienne Moerz, the mother of a 15-year-old student at Ralston Valley High School in Arvada, Colo., said having kids visit the brewery encourages underage drinking, KDVR reports. Moerz said the assignment is essentially a “how-to” guide for students to brew their own beer, and that since her family has a history of alcoholism, she doesn’t want her daughter exposed to alcohol at such an age.

“I don’t see any reason to teach a 15 year old the steps in brewing alcohol,” she said.

The Jefferson County school board said the curriculum is standard, but that they would review the assignment.

“While we value the efforts our teachers make to inspire learning in our students, we will be reviewing the assignment in question,” the school district said late Monday.

[KDVR]

43 comments
TheBrewersDaughter
TheBrewersDaughter

My father and uncle both worked for the brewery's all my life. I grew up going on tours, I grew up going to the family picnics for the employees, it was always in our home although my parents rarely had a glass of wine. I don't like alcohol and I don't drink. These tours have been available to the public for many decades. As long as the child is accompanied with an adult, your allowed on the tour. Hello people does any one not remember "Bush Gardens"? It is a fermentation tour! For those who don't know, when you are in the brewery "It Does Not Smell Like Beer! It smells of fermenting hops & it stinks! For anyone who driven down a freeway past a brewery you smell the stench of hops. Before adults go and crush this important understand on this fermentation process. Do you really think a cheese factory smells like the wonderful cheese you eat? Ah... NO! It smells like *** ! Moldy, Nasty ***! The brewery is going to smell just as bad.  I suggest you go to your local commercial brewery and take a professional tour first before you go and pass judgement and dirty it up with all the negative hoopla you may choose to dream up. It is not what you might think. This really is just a fermentation processing tour.

AdrienneMaerz
AdrienneMaerz

As the concerned mother in the story, it is important for everyone to know there is so much more to this story. It is not a field trip, it is an entire project on fermentation that basically asks kids to create a "how to" guide on brewing beer. It also asks students to compare it to the process of making other alcohols (wine, hard alcohol, ect.). Then, students are offered extra credit for touring the brewery. There are so many things wrong with this assignment. First, teaching it in a public high school, in a required class is unacceptable, especially when the exact same process can be taught in other ways. Second, it is insensitive to families who have struggled with alcoholism. Next, it does not take into consideration anyone who may have moral or religious values about alcohol. I am happy to explain my thought process, and engage in a conversation with anyone who can be an adult about this. I will not respond to personal attacks, name calling, or inappropriate comments. This has nothing to do with being a helicopter mom, or not allowing my daughter to explore science. Public high school simply is not the time or place. What you do with your kids on your own time is your business. As a last note, my daughter does not share my opinion about this issue.

SunlinerAT
SunlinerAT

When I took HS chemistry (1961), one class project was fermenting sugar mash and distilling alcohol from it.  I'll bet her head would have exploded!

Jimbino
Jimbino

Wow. I brew my own beer in Colorado and find it an exacting process. The kid will learn lots of great lessons regarding sterilization, specific gravity, weights and measures, and the properties of various ingredients.

When parents stand in the way of a kid's education, we need to relieve them of their duties.

Worse than brewing is the brainwashing the kids get in church. Maybe even videogames and cell phones, too. If I ran the school, the kids would learn to wager, invest, brew beer, ferment cabbage, make cheese, and balance a checkbook. About sex and babies, too, not to mention male and female sexual mutilation.

NaphiSoc
NaphiSoc

brewing is applied science - there may not be other places that are willing to give a tour like this. there are a lot of measurements and QA checks - kids can be exposed to engineers


this is sad.

JassonBlaair
JassonBlaair

Parents at a Colorado school are outraged their kids were encouraged to visit the local hospital to earn extra credit in science class.

The teacher wanted students to learn about the birthing process as part of a lesson on biology. But Adrienne Moerz, the mother of a 15-year-old student at Ralston Valley High School in Arvada, Colo., said having kids visit the hospital encourages underage sexing, KDVR reports. Moerz said the assignment is essentially a “how-to” guide for students to engage in fornication, and that since her family has a history of fooling around, she doesn’t want her daughter exposed to sex at such an age.

“I don’t see any reason to teach a 15 year old the steps in making babies,” she said.

The Jefferson County school board said the curriculum is standard, but that they would review the assignment.



BarkMayglen
BarkMayglen

This is disturbing and unthinkable.  Encouraging minors to  visit the frightening and grave world of alcoholism  is simply mindblowing.  This unsettling and insane project should  be immediately terminated along with the staggeringly stupid so-called educators that hatched it.    

MichaelMitchell1
MichaelMitchell1

I can't believe a parent would think in this way. It's a science project and if this will cause your little darling to start drinking, then you'd better have a talk with your child. If they visit a car assembly plant, will they then become car thieves? Visit a jail and then become criminals? This is really a problem for the parent to deal with, not the school or the school district, or even the child themselves.

GlennNorgren
GlennNorgren

What part of "EXTRA credit did this parent not "understand?

KevininPHX
KevininPHX

What a great plan.  Pretend alcohol doesn't exist.  That way, my kids will be never the wiser and won't ever drink.  I can't believe I didn't think of this myself.

MommaJennM
MommaJennM

This is ridiculous! THIS encourages underage drinking? This is a how-to in making your own beer? Lady, if your child is smart enough to turn on the computer he or she already has access on how to make homemade beer. Get a grip! I think this is a fun and educational extra credit assignment & can act as a fun family trip!

DredScott
DredScott

There is always one wing nut in the crowd that just has to ruin it for everybody else.....

L_Dave
L_Dave

I've taken my kids to the brewery tour in St. Louis.  That said, the school should have used some common sense and obtained parental permission.

justnic
justnic

I think this woman severely underestimates the trade of brewing if she thinks a 15 year old kid can learn how to do it just like that from a one day field trip. This is ridiculous, unless the kids have a large store of malt, hops, vats, etc, I really doubt they're going to go around home-brewing beer. If you're so worried about your child brewing beer, then maybe you need to look after them more closely, because it would be pretty hard to sneak that much beer making stuff into their room or house without a good parent noticing.

RayZfox
RayZfox

“I don’t see any reason to teach a 15 year old the steps in brewing alcohol,”

Nothing to learn except science, history, health, chemistry, home ec, business, and general life skills.  But we wouldn't want our kids to know any of that.  They should leave school knowing nothing unequipped to get a job and not knowing what beer even is.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol

CortlandRichmond
CortlandRichmond

Some parents even get upset at kids seeing cherished stereotypes -- racial, religious, sexual, political, economical, and, I suppose, comical too -- demolished by reality

EdHotnix
EdHotnix

I had a science teacher in high school that had us make wine in class to demonstrate fermentation, about 15 years ago. Other science classes also involved dissecting fetal pigs and giant grasshoppers, using Bunsen burners, and launching pumpkins. All of these things taught valuable educational lessons. Maybe she should be open about the effects and pitfalls of alcohol use with her child rather than sheltering her. 

pwndbypandas
pwndbypandas

My kids love science and documentaries, and certainly don't drink, but their favorite the past year was "How Beer Saved the World" (I think that is what it's called). 


Beer has always played a very important part in civilization. Without it, we'd not be where we are. In fact, that brewery tour should give bonus points to history too, not just science.

javahead001
javahead001

It's much easier to dump some Hawaiian punch into a boat bottom (in a jug) on a summers day. In many areas (like where I was raised) there was enough natural yeast in the air, in particular around warm summer lakes, to start the process. The Punch, has LOTS of natural sugars to feed the yeast, and dropping it in the bottom of a boat, A: keeps people from finding it, and B: keeps it at a good temp, to grow the yeast.  

That's the old school.


subpupdfw
subpupdfw

Brewing your own beer takes quite a lot of time.  My brother does it from time to time.  So, I doubt teens are going to invest that kind of time to just get wasted.  There are a LOT of easier routes to go here.

needname33
needname33

Was offered this as extra credit at my old high school in high school 30 years ago, Budweiser not Coors was the only difference and no one cared.  People were a lot less uptight back then.

AverageGuysBeer
AverageGuysBeer

If I had a kid I would be upset that they took them to the Coors brewery and not one of Colorado's many amazing craft brewers! That is a travesty! Personally the best way to have children learn to respect alcohol is not to demonize it and hide it away, but show that consumption of quality products (not Coors) in moderation is a normal activity. 

Anyone interested in checking out my thoughts on beer can here on my blog - 

averageguysguidetobeer.blogspot.com

mgcdrafts
mgcdrafts

There is a major problem with this article, and it is the headline.  Nothing in the article suggests that this was a field trip; it was merely a suggestion about how to get extra credit.  Perhaps the headline writer should read the article and those offering comments should read more than the headline.


As for the parent, if you don't like the suggestion, tell your kid to do so well in the class that she doesn't need extra credit.

mgcdrafts
mgcdrafts

Saying that visiting a brewery encourages underage drinking is like saying that visiting a sewage treatment plan encourages defecation.

lizanull
lizanull

There are PLENTY of ways to teach children about the "fermentation process" but it might take some actual EFFORT and WORK on the part of the teacher.

Obviously this teacher was TOO LAZY to do much more than collect some permission slips and find a bus driver. 

WHY are teachers so sorry and worthless these days, I wonder......

bcdieff
bcdieff

Please, I would be happy my son got to see a brewery.  Science is everywhere, get over it closed minded souls!

#libtardedamerica
#libtardedamerica

"“I don’t see any reason to teach a 15 year old the steps in brewing alcohol,” she said."

oh for god's sake. get over it. it's learning about a scientific process. and these kids are in high school. they all live at home. who cares if they know how to brew beer? they live at home and couldn't do it without getting busted (or, if they were able to, that's on the parents because that's way too much crap to just hide in your closet) so does it really matter?

furthermore, you brew beer. not alcohol. the alcohol ferments. the beer is brewed. why am i not surprised that a woman too stupid to understand that you don't "brew" alcohol is freaking out over this?


Ironman92
Ironman92

Same thing with sex ed, amirite?

SunlinerAT
SunlinerAT

@JassonBlaair :  As we know, teens don't need any instruction for fooling around.  They have hormones and are quite willing to help each other learn.

SunlinerAT
SunlinerAT

@BarkMayglen :  Did you know that Louis Pasteur discovered the process of "Pasteurization," which we rely on to keep milk fresh, almost by accident?  The actual focus of his research was finding a way to keep beer from spoiling so quickly.

If not for the ability of yeasts to convert sugars into alcohol, we would not have leavened bread to eat.  If we did not have wine and apple cider, we would not have vinegar.  Wine and brandy have been used as antiseptics, astringents, and anesthetics for millennia.  The body of John Paul Jones was returned to the US in a barrel of brandy.

Alcohol, like other substances, is not inherently evil.  That it is misused by people is what is bad.  It is the behavior of people and the poor choices made by them, not the substances.

Teens need to be taught about the dangers of alcohol abuse as well as the beneficial uses of it.  On a similar note, not educating teens about sex and birth control will not prevent teen pregnancies.  Hormones will prevail!  Likewise, making birth control available to teens will not encourage teens to become sexually active.  They already are!  The teen pregnancy rate clearly shows that!  What it will do (Sex education and birth control) is lower that pregnancy rate and, hopefully, the STI rate at the same time.

Living in ignorance and being a proponent for its continuance is a far greater danger than exposing teens to what is waiting for them in just a few years as "adults."

BradHart
BradHart

@GlennNorgren The part where her little darling won't get it if she doesn't do the work.

SunlinerAT
SunlinerAT

@MommaJennM :  And if she hasn't noticed the large jug of brownish liquid bubbling over in the corner or the bottling equipment UPS just delivered from Amazon along with the chemistry equipment, it's probably because of the margaritas and Xanax diet she's on.

BradHart
BradHart

@L_Dave The school didn't sponsor the trip, make the arrangements, or even have it as an official event.  The teacher said she would give extra credit to those that visited on their own time and on their own time wrote a report about fermentation in a real world application.  This parent is upset other kids will get extra credit for doing something she won't let her kid do.

SunlinerAT
SunlinerAT

@pwndbypandas :  Those of us old enough to remember books and actually reading them, know that for millennia most water was not fit to drink.  Those who lived in warm regions grew grapes and drank wine.  Those in colder regions grew grains and made beer and ale.  A cursory glance at Europe today shows exactly what I'm talking about!

In the colonies of the New World, a similar evolution took place.  Wine made from the grapes of eastern North America were inferior, being described as tasting "foxy."  What did grow were apples, but not apples as we know them.  These were not the sweet tasting fruit of today.  They were sour and bitter, but they did have sugar and so were used to make cider.  Apple cider - hard cider - was the common beverage of the northern British colonies.

Meanwhile, down south and in the "indies," the French were (and still do) making Rhum from cane juice in their colonies.  The Spanish and British focused on making sugar.  Molasses, the byproduct of sugar production was dumped into the sea as waste - until!  Someone figured out that it had enough sugar left in it to ferment.  The Spanish and British colonies were in the Rum distilling business.  Rum production became so important that it was used as currency throughout the region.  One of the reasons that Britain shifted her focus to the southern colonies during the American Revolution is that the cotton and sugar production of the South was considered more valuable than the industry and shipping of the North.

Science and History intertwined indeed!

justnic
justnic

@lizanull Encouraging kids to see science in action is not being lazy. This is a great way for kids to see that science is everywhere, that it even helps to brew a drink that is celebrated around the world. It sounds to me like the teacher has already spoken about fermentation to begin with. Why would you encourage kids to see fermentation in action if you've never ever spoken of it before? If you really think teachers are so worthless then maybe you should be a teacher yourself, since you clearly think so few others meet the requirements.

ATLWmn
ATLWmn

@lizanull   It's one thing to teach it (like I'm sure they were doing), but it's another thing to see it in action.  One minute, people like you are whining that teachers only lecture without giving real world examples, and the next you're all whining that they're lazy for wanting kids to take time out of their own lives to continue learning outside the classroom.  I know it's cool and all to demonize teachers nowadays, but it's just gotten old.  You don't like something?  Do something constructive about it instead of railing against educators on a message board.

nic/nice
nic/nice

@lizanull maybe you should read the article instead of the headline....It wasnt a field trip the students were encouraged to go for extra credit ON THEIR OWN TIME....reading comprehension skills you need them

mrbean
mrbean

@lizanull You think organizing a field trip is laziness? Wow. I call this ignorance on your part.

KevininPHX
KevininPHX

@BradHart @KevininPHX   You're right, I hadn't thought of that.  So, abstinence only, Just Say No, and don't teach anything about fermentation.  Then, common sense dictates, no pregnancies, no drug users and no drinkers.

  It irritates me when perfect solutions are prevented from being implemented.  Damn Liberal Media.

BradHart
BradHart

@KevininPHX @BradHart We are obviously teaching extra lessons in sarcasm for as much of it as my teenager comes home from school with.