Whiskey and Cigars Are This 107-Year-Old Veteran’s Secrets to a Long Life

5 secrets to long life from one of the oldest veterans.

  • Share
  • Read Later
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

Richard Overton, 107-year-old WWII veteran, listens during a Veterans Day ceremony attended by President Barack Obama, commemorating Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2013, at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va.

President Barack Obama honored 107-year-old Richard Overton, one of the oldest World War II veterans in the U.S., during a Veterans Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery this morning. The former member of the Army’s Aviation Engineer Battalion also had breakfast with the commander-in-chief and others who served in the military.

But what’s the Austin, Texas, resident’s secret to living a long life?

- Whiskey in morning coffee or club soda. “It keeps your muscles tender,” he told FOX News.

- Cigars, up to 12 a day. He received a box of 12 during a ceremony in Austin last week.

Aspirin, also taken daily.

Yard work: trim trees, take care of the horses, clean the driveways.

- “Staying out of trouble,” he told The Houston Chronicle.

Add those five tidbits to other supercentenarians’ longevity secrets like bacon, Hog’s Head Cheese, mackerel sushi, and sun-bathing.

(h/t The Huffington Post)

MORE: Happy 114th Birthday to Jeralean Talley

MORE: 105-Year-Old Woman Eats a Lot of Bacon

2 comments
FrancesZapata
FrancesZapata

Good for him, but this is misleading. Beer and wine are healthy in moderation because they prevent diseases. That much is true. But there is no such thing as smoking in moderation. Smoking kills. Period. I have seen it. And so to say cigars, cigarettes, etc can help you have a long life is IRRESPONSIBLE. How can people have forgotten of Terrie Hall so easily? *sighs* It's like she said: you may not get cancer, but it will take a toll on your body nonetheless. And regardless, are you going to take that gamble with your life?... I have come to conclude that even though we live in the world of "selfies," in the "me generation," we have ironically become so apathetic that we don't care about ourselves. Our generation is oxymoronic.