SVU IRL: Man Accused of Serial Sexual Assault Allowed to Blame His Twin in Court

When a suspect has a twin, DNA evidence can be severely questioned.

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Corbis
Corbis

It wasn’t me, it was my evil twin.

That alibi could arguably be the most famous, overused and least believed response to an accusation in history. But for possibly the first time it will be admissible in court, a judge ruled on Friday.

Aaron Lucas, 32, a Fort Collins, Colo., army officer accused in several sexual assaults on female children will be able to point the finger at his twin brother, the Colorado Springs Gazette reported. In his ruling, Judge David Shakes said it would be “inappropriate” to hinder Lucas’ attorneys from opening the idea of his twin, Brian Lucas, as the culprit in court because they both share the same DNA.

“Whether it’s persuasive or not – that’s not my role,” Shakes said at a Friday hearing. “It’s the role of the jury.”

In cases where a crime suspect has a twin, DNA evidence can be strongly questioned and has come up in several other cases. In a British case last August, twins Mohammed and Aftab Asghar were accused of a rape, but prosecutors were unsure which, if either, of them to accuse. Also, in 2009, a set of twins in Marseille, France, were accused in a series of rapes but police were unable to determine which to prosecute.

There has to be an episode of Law and Order: SVU about this.

1 comments
Concerned100
Concerned100

Is it not time to have people on a lie detector machine in court?

It is not foolproof but it will identify 99% of those who lie and we will cut court time by 90% because most guilty people will plead a lower sentence rather than risk failing the lie detector.

It will also ensure speedy trials and cut our legal expenses by 80% because less time will be spent in court and fewer criminals will need a lawyer.