These Are the Top 10 Most Dangerous Jobs in the U.S.

Hint: Just turn on Discovery or the History Channel

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If your biggest workplace safety concern is spilling hot coffee on your hand, this list of the 10 most dangerous jobs in the U.S. is going to feel intense.

Logging tops this list of risky roles, with 127.8 deaths occurring per 100,000 workers. The data comes from the 2012 National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries and is represented in a terrifying infographic released today by FinancesOnline.com. Last year’s most dangerous job was fishing, which slides to the number two spot.

And while most of the list is represented by blue collar positions, pilot and flight engineer — also the highest paying occupation on the list — comes in at number three. It’s also worth noting that a staggering 41% of these workplace fatalities were related to transportation incidents.

Despite the somber tone, there’s still some good news: workers are still much safer than they were just 10 years ago. In 1992, 6,217 fatal work injuries occurred. In 2013, that number dwindled to 4,383.

This means we should expect Ax Men, Deadliest Catch and Ice Road Truckers to all get picked up for another season.

Top 10 most dangerous jobs in America: It's not truck drivers, electricians or power line installers who have the most safety hazards
Source: http://careers.financesonline.com | Author: Alex Hillsberg | Follow our Facebook
11 comments
KellyKlein
KellyKlein

I would love to know which pilots are still making six figures.

JamesGThomson
JamesGThomson

I notice that Law Enforcement Officer doesn't even make the top 10.  Which points out the exaggeration of the danger of Law Enforcement work rife throughout society.  It explains why so many LEOs are fearful of being shot by jaywalkers and kids armed with sandwiches with the stress that Academies (without statistical basis) place on the danger of each traffic stop, and why so many officers and even district attorneys are willing to allow any shooting, of often unarmed, cooperating and innocent civilians, in order to protect officer safety.  It explains why citizens are 3-4 times more likely to be shot by a cop than a cop be shot by a citizen (innocent or guilty). 

LarryIBEW
LarryIBEW

I was a IBEW union power linemen all my life...Did anything and everything that others could not and would not do...1958 to 1991...Was making more then $68,000   20 / 25 years ago...They were  making between 110,00 and up into 160,000 last year...Worked some 2 week ice storm work 25 years ago making $13,000/1$5,000 working 100-105 hours a week all double time...Motel and anything you wanted to eat...LOL...Some guys eat 3 diners at night...Between 1880 and 1930 50% of linemen were killed on the job...Power line work is much different today then when I was tramping around the USA and working in the oil fields in Arab Countrys...One thing 80% of the men were drinkers...In the bars and on the job...In N.Y. State that all stopped about 1971...If you did not love line work...Then you did not belong doing the work...I saw more out in the world in one year then a guy who worked in an office for 40 years...Saw and worked with 1000,s of people as an office worker- works with the same people year in and year out...Line work is like a race driver...YOU know something is going to happen to you some day sooner or later...I did not get away free...Got into 13,800V to ground on Amtrak  NYC...10 months and 11 days  I made $118,000  ...That was back in 1991..Have lived  in warm sunny Mexico for the past 20 year...You leave the drugs and guns to the cartel and life is very safe here,,,Much more then the big Citys in The USA FOR SURE....    

SO TURE...

 We worked with old timers who always was telling us "never do this" or "always do this", because after having done it so long they had seen almost everything and had learned ways to avoid those one-in-a-thousand catastrophes.  , When something scary happened, some oddball "rule" of theirs that had never made any sense suddenly became quite clear.

 

Would enjoy yacking with any retied power linemen.. simon1249@yahoo.om

Sadean87
Sadean87

I think your math is wrong. 2013-1992 is 21 years, not ten ...though it does feel like only ten years ago...

Romalliv1217
Romalliv1217

How about the men and women in the military and police service?  Aren't they included?

sanya19911005
sanya19911005

Although these jobs are dangerous, without them, the life will be even harder!!

Thanks for those who commit to these jobs!!!!

Yakimandrew
Yakimandrew

I have done 6 of these jobs for a living at some point or another in my adult life (mostly when I was young and indestructable) but now I sit at a desk all day. I do feel safer, but I also miss it. I learned a lot about workplace safety - especially when I worked logging operations - - the thing that struck me most is that it is fairly easy to look around and find obvious, common sense hazards, It often seemed that when someone got badly hurt/killed it was either when someone ignored an obvious hazard and did something really dumb, or when something happened that, even in retrospect, was so unlikely as to be almost unbelievable. We worked with an old timer who always was telling us "never do this" or "always do this", because after having done it so long he had seen almost everything and had learned ways to avoid those one-in-a-million catastrophes.  I have always felt that the fact that we never had a serious injury on our crew was a direct result of this.  Often, when something scary happened, some oddball "rule" of his that had never made any sense suddenly became quite clear.

dmk9561
dmk9561

I think that I remember reading once that the dangers for those folks who climb radio towers for maintenance was quite a lot higher than any of these.  Perhaps they only list occupations that have at least 100k people doing them, for the sake of accurately calculating the statistic.

Meshakhad
Meshakhad

I think there's one job you're missing. Number three on your list (between pilots and fishers) should be President of the United States. Of the forty-three men to hold the office, four were assassinated, nearly one in ten.

radiofox
radiofox

@Meshakhad   I also have to wonder about astronauts. Presidents and astronauts weren't considered because the total numbers are few, but the percentage of deaths overall is pretty high.