Best Paper Plane Ever: Miniature 777 Made Out of Manila Folders

It took five years, a decent amount of glue and a whole lot of patience

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Time to retire your paper airplane game, everyone, because there’s no way you could ever match this guy.

Luca Iaconi-Stewart built a 1:60-scale replica of a 777 jetliner using manila folders (and dabs of glue). It’s insanely precise and almost as complicated as the real aircraft. It even features retractable landing gear, Wired reports.

Iaconi-Stewart began working on the project five years ago, inspired by the models he made out of manila paper in a high school architecture class. He designed the aircraft in Adobe Illustrator based on a detailed diagram of an Air India 777-300ER. Eventually, he printed the forms on manila, sharpened his X-Acto knife, busted out his tweezers, and got to work.

The seats alone took an entire summer to craft – 20 minutes for an economy seat, four to six hours for business class, and eight hours for first class, Wired notes. The engine took a month to design and another four to assemble. It was so time consuming that he eventually dropped out of college to focus fully on the project.

The time-lapse video above shows just how much work went into every tiny detail. Check out Iaconi-Stewart’s Flickr album to see close-up photos of everything from the overhead bins to the cockpit.

Time to retire your paper airplane game, everyone, because there’s no way you could ever match this guy.

Luca Iaconi-Stewart built a 1:60-scale replica of a 777 jetliner using manila folders (and dabs of glue). It’s insanely precise and almost as complicated as the real aircraft. It even features retractable landing gear, Wired reports.

Iaconi-Stewart began working on the project five years ago, inspired by the models he made out of manila paper in a high school architecture class. He designed the aircraft in Adobe Illustrator based on a detailed diagram of an Air India 777-300ER. Eventually, he printed the forms on manila, sharpened his X-Acto knife, busted out his tweezers, and got to work.

The seats alone took an entire summer to craft – 20 minutes for an economy seat, four to six hours for business class, and eight hours for first class, Wired notes. The engine took a month to design and another four to assemble. It was so time consuming that he eventually dropped out of college to focus fully on the project.

The time-lapse video above shows just how much work went into every tiny detail. Check out Iaconi-Stewart’s Flickr album to see close-up photos of everything from the overhead bins to the cockpit.