The Best Tippers in America

The cities with the most generous tippers

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Square, a mobile payments company in San Francisco, has released an infographic that is supposed to provide a glimpse of tipping patterns in 10 major cities, based on the “percentage of customers who tip and the average tip size.” According to the image below, Denver customers are the most generous, while people in Atlanta and Tampa are the least, comparatively.

TippingInAmerica_Square

Square

In the last year, a similar survey found that Southern states were the least generous when it came to tipping, while New Yorkers were the most generous. On a global scale, a Trip Advisor study of 9,000 travelers also found that Germans and Americans are the most likely to tip when they go on vacation.

And if you need advice on how not to tip, just browse Reddit.

8 comments
dewayneg
dewayneg

Just wanted to point out there are only 7 states where servers earn actual minimum wage.  The other 43 states offer anywhere from $7/hr to $2.13/hr.  Please, tip your servers, for most of them that is their primary income!

mmortal03
mmortal03

Even in Chicago, 37% of people DON'T tip at all?

brr8760
brr8760

"Southern states were the least generous when it came to tipping, while New Yorkers were the most generous"--- that makes sense. New Yorkers tend to be more liberal than the Southern states. And the definition of the word liberal is... generous! And people aren't ONLY going to be generous in their political life... they will also be generous with tipping, compliments, empathy, etc., etc. I've been saying this for years, but this is the first time I've read it in black & white.

crashtx1
crashtx1

@brr8760  That could be the dumbest argument I've ever heard. In snobby NY it's easy to toss down a few bucks to your poor server, but do you ever hear people talk about how friendly those people are? Nope, you hear it about Texas, where we actually help people.

andyflyer
andyflyer

@brr8760  Generosity requires some sort of self sacrifice - thus there can be no "political" generosity as political action by definition requires that person A and his or her fellow voters force person B to do something that person A wants to do but person B doesn't. Voting for laws which you think help others does not embody self sacrifice - actually giving to a charity does embody this (and yes, so does tipping, I suppose...but see the last paragraph for a caveat), and one can do so without attempting to leverage the coercive apparatus of the state.


Other studies have supposedly shown "conservatives" to be more generous in charitable contributions...of course, the validity of these studies is certainly questionable as most generous acts I've witnessed tend to not be easily quantifiable empirically.  For example, a person who allows a financially-distressed friend to live with them for free while getting back on their feet is most certainly acting in a very generous way (far more than a restaurant patron who leaves an 18 vs. 16% tip, I might add) but this act cannot possibly be included in empirical studies as it is not noticeable to a random observer outside of the situation.


Thus, these sorts of studies probably belong in the "information we're better off not knowing" column, so to speak, as they can very easily mislead one to incorrect conclusions.


And as far as using government to force people to do things that you think are generous?  Well, voting for some politician that you think is "generous" is not a generous act - it requires no self-sacrifice on your own part and...even if it did,,,it's a waste of time because statistically your vote doesn't matter anyway, except in perhaps very small elections.  In fact, I'd argue that it's actually more of a "selfish" act as you yourself are the one that reaps the "feel good" effect of such a vote while producing no measurable positive outcome for other people.


Finally, the "feel good" effect of any "generous" act on the emotions of the giving party can be quite significant...thus, one most certainly could make an argument that no "generous" act is truly "generous" because the giver in the equation is axiomatically made better off emotionally as a result of the act; humans generally don't act in a way that makes themselves knowingly worse-off, and this reasoning applies equally to both "generous" and "selfish" acts.


Oh...and I'd say the figures from San Francisco completely destroy your conclusion to begin with.

richard.mudd4
richard.mudd4

@brr8760 Opps!  I was going to say....  Too little information to try to make that conclusion.  Data shows the reverse is true when it comes to charitable donations.  Also the data shown shows vary little range from bests tippers to worst(15.4 - 16.8).  Also, every city listed is generally liberal (esp. Austin, and Atlanta) thinking about it, hard to name a conservative city.

Then again...  Whats the deal with only 63% at best tipping???  Anyone that I know of that worked in a restaurant would leave if 1 in 3 never bothered tipping