This Map Shows Where in the U.S. You Have the Highest Chance of Getting Struck by Lightning

PSA of the day

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Today, Atlantic Cities points out that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published a map of lightning strikes in the U.S. According to the description of the map in the Google Maps Gallery, the map is organized by county and represents incidents over “the years 1995-2000 and 2001-2009.” The darker the shade of red, the more “events” have occurred, and the map breaks down each county’s data in terms of total number of injuries, fatalities, cost of property damage, and cost of crop damage.

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8 comments
mike.f.1952
mike.f.1952

Had lightning strike my cottonwood tree about 75 feet from my house last summer. It vaporized 52 feet of the wire ham radio antenna that I had strung up to it.  It happened about 10:30 pm in one of the most intense rain and lightning storms that I had yet seen here in Roundup, MT.  I had just walked out onto my front porch when it happened.  Needless to say that I did not check on my antenna until I was sure that the lightning storm had completely passed.  It also ruined my cordless phone and the power supply to my amateur radio (luckily I had disconnected the radio from the antenna and power supply so it was not damaged).  The damage to the power supply and surge protector that it was connected to was so extensive I am surprised that it did not cause a fire in my radio shack which is separate from my house.  Needless to say that I am planning on upgrading the grounding and surge protection in my radio shack before this coming summers storm season gets here.


Mike

MarkmBha
MarkmBha

I was hit and flew 10 meters backward.

Had a headache and lost hearing for a few days.

Also lost my hair... but lived!

montecarlostat
montecarlostat

Gee, the highest events occur in highly populated areas.  Imagine that.

MicheleDavis
MicheleDavis

What a useless map. It doesn't take population density into account.

jasperdog500
jasperdog500

Strange...In  Harris county LA, there were 81 injuries and 111 fatalities.  Most places have 5  to 20 times more injuries than fatalities.  What's up there????

AndrewPogue
AndrewPogue

I lived in King County WA (seattle) for 15 years. Lightning never happened that often. 

DoobieBrothers
DoobieBrothers

@AndrewPogue : Maybe someone close to you will explain what this article is about, helping you to understand, without making you feel embarrassed. Maybe.